Call to action for journalists | Legacy media as outsiders | How social beat newsrooms for influence

By Matt Carroll <@MattCData>

Nov. 15, 2016: Cool stuff about journalism, once a week. Get notified via email? Subscribe: 3toread (at) gmail.

Trump plays his trump card

It’s all about Trump fallout this week. And out of hundreds of pieces written, here’s three of the best.

Call to action for journalists: Margaret Sullivan at the Washington Post writes a stirring call to action for journalists operating in a world where they are openly hated by the president: “If January 2017 isn’t going to herald disaster for press rights — and the citizens served by a free and independent press — we’re going to need some help. We’re going to need some heroes.” Absolutely true.

Legacy media needs to act as outsiders: New media sites, operating largely in the Facebook universe, ran circles around legacy media during the election, writes John Herrman for the NYT. And legacy media is still acting as if they are on the inside, close to power — but they aren’t, and they need to embrace their outsider status. An interesting take on strategic action for newsrooms.

How social media is beating newsrooms for influence: Mainstream media wrote incredibly tough stories about Trump, ranging from his ducking of federal income taxes to his (possibly) illegal use of a nonprofit. Yet the stories didn’t seem to stick. For an explanation, look no further than collapse of traditional news media’s influence and the rise of social media. Story by Pablo Boczkowski for Nieman Lab.

Bonus (non-Trump) read: Nuggets of wisdom, from the MIT Media Lab: Cool tips for building a creative, supportive environment at work or school. I just started at Northeastern U as a journalism prof. But I spent the past 2–½ wonderful years at Civic Media at the Media Lab. Some great ideas for running anything from a newsroom to a classroom.

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Matt Carroll is a journalism professor at Northeastern University.

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