Big Tech, Google and YouTube actively interfering in the election.

Fred Showker
Nov 3, 2020 · 2 min read

Most people aren’t paying attention, but I sure am. Should big tech be allowed to cancel the First Amendment? What if the tables were turned?

Google, YouTube’s owner controls all the searches that are performed on either platform. This was tested a dozen times with a dozen different topics and all the results were the same. This is a travesty. This is the direct opposite to what Google’s mission statement claims. Google’s YouTube and any of the big tech companies like Facebook and Twitter should NOT be allowed to cancel the first Amendment. Period.

The search phrase was copied directly from the video. That SHOULD have resulted in the post being the very FIRST in the results . No. Instead Google/YouTube returned two pages of their own results, NONE of which had the search string. Finally, there it was, after the 2nd fold. Most people won’t even scroll down the page that far.

Here are the actual results:

Now, you don’t need to fact this. Look at the very top, and see the search phrase. Then look at the circled description of the post. Try it yourself. Ask for a Fox News or any other conservative content, verbatim. See what kind of results you get.

Done. I’m done. . . . thanks for reading!

In case you get to read this article, and it’s not censored or blocked by Medium or Facebook, here’s a Facebook friendly MEME you can post if you agree that Big Tech cannot be allowed to censor or cancel anyone.

60-Second Window

Fred Showker exploring design, tech and media issues, since 1985

60-Second Window

Fred Showker‘s editorial column “60-Second Window” in 1987 as part of a syndicated news service distributed, via diskette, to computer user groups all over the country. The 60 Second Window explores issues surrounding technology and it’s effects on people and society.

Fred Showker

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Design, Typography & Graphics Magazine and 60-Seconds exploring technology since 1987

60-Second Window

Fred Showker‘s editorial column “60-Second Window” in 1987 as part of a syndicated news service distributed, via diskette, to computer user groups all over the country. The 60 Second Window explores issues surrounding technology and it’s effects on people and society.