If you plan to rent out your home, it is important that you charge a “fair rental price.”

A “fair rental price” will demonstrate you have a profit-seeking motive. If it turns out your have not demonstrated that you have a profit-seeking motive, your rental expense deductions may be limited.

It is prudent to do research on comparable rental homes in your area and to keep records of your findings, as well as any copies of advertisements, to demonstrate your profit-seeking motive, should you be audited.

The foregoing is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, tax advice. This website offers general answers to general questions based on information obtained from www.irs.gov and other…


The answer is yes in certain cases, but even then there are limitations to the amount of deductible expenses that can be carried over.

Use Worksheet 5–1 to determine whether you are eligible to carry over your deductible expenses and, if so, how much may be carried over.

The foregoing is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, tax advice. This website offers general answers to general questions based on information obtained from www.irs.gov and other publicly available information. Collaborative Fund cannot be held responsible for the results of any position taken on a tax return by any user of this site. …


Out-of-pocket expenses associated with maintaining your rental property may be deducted from your income for the time it is rented.

Apportioning rental and personal expenses is done by how many days the home was rented as opposed to used for personal use.

However, you may only deduct expenses for the portion of the year that the home was used as a rental property. This is calculated by taking the number of days that you receive a “fair rental price” in exchange for renting your home and dividing it by the number of days that the home is used for “personal use.”

[IRS]: Personal Use of Dwelling Unit (Including Vacation Home)

[IRS]: Publication 527, Residential Rental Property

The foregoing is not…


The expenses allocated to the rental use should be deducted on Schedule E (Form 1040) of your tax return.

(Remember, personal expenses are deducted on Schedule A if you do not elect to use the standard deduction.)

[IRS]: Reporting Rental Income, Expenses, and Losses.

The foregoing is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, tax advice. This website offers general answers to general questions based on information obtained from www.irs.gov and other publicly available information. Collaborative Fund cannot be held responsible for the results of any position taken on a tax return by any user of this site. Users should always obtain independent tax advice from a qualified tax professional to determine the tax consequences applicable to such user’s personal situation.


If you spend money on a deductible expense that you utilize for both the personal use of your home and the rental use of your home, you may only deduct the part of the expense that is apportioned to its rental use.

[IRS]: Dividing Expenses.

The foregoing is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, tax advice. This website offers general answers to general questions based on information obtained from www.irs.gov and other publicly available information. Collaborative Fund cannot be held responsible for the results of any position taken on a tax return by any user of this site. Users should always obtain independent tax advice from a qualified tax professional to determine the tax consequences applicable to such user’s personal situation.


Any expenses used solely for the room or area that you rent out can be wholly deducted (or reported as depreciation, where applicable) from your taxes.

However, any expenses that apply to the maintenance or improvement of both the rented part of your home and the part utilized for personal use must be split.

For example, you purchase bedding that will be used exclusively by renting guests in the spare bedroom. The entire cost of the bedding can be deducted as a business expense.

On the other hand, for expenses that apply to the entire home you may only deduct the portion of that expense that is apportioned to the rental portion of your home.

[IRS]: Reporting Income and Deductions.

The foregoing is not intended to…


Yes. The income received from renting out a portion of your home is income and must be reported.

However rental income may be exempt from taxation (though this means you may also not deduct business expenses related to the rental), under certain circumstances.

You may still deduct on Schedule A (Form 1040), Itemized Deductions, the interest, taxes, and casualty and theft losses that are allowed for non-rental property.

[IRS]: Reporting Income and Deductions.

The foregoing is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, tax advice. This website offers general answers to general questions based on information obtained from www.irs.gov and other publicly available information. Collaborative Fund cannot be held responsible for the results of…


The following are acceptable car expenses that are eligible to be deducted:

  • Depreciation
  • Licenses
  • Gas
  • Oil
  • Tolls
  • Lease payments
  • Insurance
  • Garage rent
  • Parking fees
  • Registration fees
  • Repairs
  • Tires

[IRS]: Deducting Car Expenses.

The foregoing is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, tax advice. This website offers general answers to general questions based on information obtained from www.irs.gov and other publicly available information. Collaborative Fund cannot be held responsible for the results of any position taken on a tax return by any user of this site. Users should always obtain independent tax advice from a qualified tax professional to determine the tax consequences applicable to such user’s personal situation.


In general, you may apportion the percentage of the car’s usage that was dedicated to your business as a business expense.

This means, for example, that the percentage of miles that you drove your car in support of your business should be applied to the total cost of of operating your car.

For instance, in a given year you drive your car 10,000 miles. 3,500 of the miles driven were for personal use and 6,500 of the miles driven were in furtherance of a business pursuit. In that year, 65% of the total amount spent on car maintenance qualify as business expenses.

It’s never too much to suggest getting advice from a tax professional as personal/business expenses are a MAJOR area…


These guidelines will focus on the two most commonly shared resources: automobiles and homes.

Generally, expenses related to a resource that is used for both personal and business purposes can only be deducted for the business purpose of the resource. It is critical that you keep detailed records of the total costs of maintaining your resource.

For example, if you are using the same car for business and personal use, only the expenses related to the car’s business purpose may be deducted. Similarly, if you are renting out a room in an apartment you are living in, only the expenses that are apportioned for the business use of the apartment are deductible.

For more…

1099.is

The Collaborative Fund worked with partners to create 1099.is, a repository of tax and accounting information for those self-employed or earning side-income.

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