How to help stop the spread of Covid19 right now, at home, in 15 minutes

The U.S. desperately needs:

- more hospital beds
- more testing kits
- more supplies (hand sanitizer, ventilators, etc.)

To get those, government officials need to be really pressed on committing to specific deliverables.

Those who can do that are the reporters who have direct access to government officials.

Unfortunately, so far those reporters aren’t doing such a great job.

That’s where you come in: if enough people demand they start asking tough questions, they’ll feel compelled to truly hold government officials accountable.

You can easily do that right now just by sending emails or tweets.

Heres a sample email you could send:

I’ve enjoyed your work, but asking Trump to rank his coronavirus performance was worthless. That question will have no impact on what the USA desperately needs.

Everyone desperately needs more hospital beds, more test kits, and more supplies like ventilators and hand sanitizer.

Everyone needs those with access to government officials to concentrate on things that actually matter.

I’m asking you to consult with experts and develop *tough* questions that will really put admin officials on the spot about specific deliverables.

For instance, ask how many additional hospital beds we’ll have in two weeks. Not just if they’re working on additional hospital beds, but demand specific numbers. Then, follow up.

Everyone is counting on you to hold admin officials accountable on things that really matter.

Are you going to do that?

Of course, modify that based on the specific reporter. You can find out who asked what by reading transcripts, watching videos of press conferences, or on social media. Then, look up the reporter’s email and write them a note. Or, just send them a condensed version of the above.

You can be friendly but firm and demand they do a better job.

Or, if it suits you, you can also play “bad cop” and inform the reporter that you’ll help me conduct a social media campaign designed to undercut them to their colleagues and audience. Reporters tend to be careerists and if they think doing business as usual is a “Career Limiting Move”, they’ll quickly correct their behavior.

No matter how you do it, let them know that the old rules are out the window: they have to start really pressing officials on specific questions that will lead to better performance.

As I know from personal experience, some people treat reporters like rock stars and take umbrage at the suggestion their idol isn’t doing their job: “I like so-and-so.” If that reporter had really pressed officials in January and February about the necessity of more tests, would it have taken so long to get the bare minimum of tests?

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