Top 10 reasons to NOT make the pledge

by Greg Loper, joyful rider extraordinaire

Greg Loper (far right) and his joyfully biking family. They’re all in!

Yeah, I know, this whole site is dedicated to getting you on your bike and riding every day in April. But, let’s be honest, this challenge isn’t for everyone. There are lots of reasons why people are not going to take part in 30 Days of Biking. Before you jump in and commit to this challenge, here are 10 reasons you may want to NOT take part in 30 Days of Biking.

  1. You may have to buy new clothes. Sad to say, but biking is likely to change your body shape … It may force you to buy a few new pieces of clothing or, if you don’t watch out, a whole new wardrobe. Not only that but, since your clothes could be a smaller size, you are getting less fabric for your money.
  2. You may meet new people. If you are the kind of person who doesn’t want to gain new friends, then signing up for 30 Days of Biking may not be for you. With people of all ages, races, nationalities, and income levels participating, you may be challenged with new friends who are different from you.
  3. You may get to know your surroundings better. If you are not careful, you may find that you experience life from a bicycle-level view. You’re more likely to discover new coffee spots, interesting parks, or just what’s down the street. If you are a person who doesn’t want to get to know new things about where you live, stay away from 30 Days of Biking.
  4. You may find that your outlook changes. Exercise is known to counteract depression and irritability (just ask my wife). If you cherish your persona as the Oscar the Grouch of 2017, you had best not take part.
  5. Your car may get lonely. Many of us have named our cars and cherish that alone time we get to enjoy when we are stuck in traffic. Getting on a bike may mean spending less time with that four-wheeled friend. Careful, if you take part in 30 Days of Biking, you risk a less intense relationship with your car.
  6. You may see 3:00 a.m. less often. Exercise can reduce insomnia. This means that if you love lying awake at night staring at the ceiling, 30 Days of Biking may deprive you of your opportunities to listen to the things that go bump in the night.
  7. You may have to give up complaining about being out of breath. Lots of people make the most of every opportunity to complain. As your lung function increases, you will lose your ability to complain, between gasps of breath, as you ascend a set of stairs. Unless you are willing to allow others to potentially one-up you in the complaint department, you should steer clear of 30 Days of Biking.
  8. Free Doughnuts. OK, as far as I know this is only a risk in Minneapolis, Minn. (EDITOR: Shout-out to Perennial Cycle!) but I wouldn’t be surprised if it spreads like a disease. You may feel like it is your responsibility to pay for your doughnuts and if you participate in one of the doughnut rides, you run the risk of an argument if you try to pay for your doughnut (and don’t even think about the coffee).
  9. You may help change how we think about transportation. This is scary. If you live in a city that is auto-centric, all it could take is one more cyclist to tip the scale toward healthier and more eco-friendly transportation. Do you really want to risk changing the culture of where you live? If the answer is no, then 30 Days of Biking is definitely not for you.
  10. You may not be able to stop. It is too late for me but, for you, there may still be time. I started cycling and, tragically, I can’t stop. I simply can’t endure more than a few days off my bike. Participating in 30 Days of Biking could put you in a similar situation. Unless you are willing to risk finding (or rediscovering) something you love, stay far, far away from 30 days of biking.

Don’t say you haven’t been warned. Now make the pledge!

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