Donald Trump — The Interview That Will Never Happen

There are a few questions I’d like to ask Donald Trump. But since he is either unlikely to answer them, or the answers are a bit too obvious, what would be the point? But since I’ve done some homework, I thought I’d share what follows for the benefit of the voters of the United States of America:

Background:

You’ve floated the idea of running for president in 1988, 2004, and 2012, as well as for governor of New York in 2006 and 2014.

Question:

What’s “the deal” this time around? How can we tell whether this is not just another publicity stint to increase the value of the Trump brand, which, per your own estimate, is about half your net worth?

Background:

Besides having stated that you are “really rich,” you have also stated that you are “really smart.” You have built a business empire supported by an industry — construction — that is notorious for employing undocumented workers. To name just one case on record, more or less 200 undocumented Polish immigrants were hired by one of your contractors in 1980 to demolish a building where Trump Tower stands today.

Question:

What’s the difference between these — and so many other undocumented construction workers you must have directly or indirectly employed throughout your business career — and the undocumented Mexican immigrants you seem so keen to kick out of the country?

Background:

Further on the topic of immigration: your paternal grandparents were German immigrants who anglicized their name Drumpf to Trump. You were born and raised in a city, New York, that has been one of the most important gateways for immigration to the United States of America. A city in which, at the feet of a big bronze lady holding a torch, there is a plaque stating

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

Yet you’ve stated publicly that

“the U.S. has become a dumping ground for everybody else’s problems. […] When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. […] They’re sending people that have lots of problems […]. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.”

Question:

Why do you think your grandparents immigrated to the U.S. from Germany? Perhaps because they had problems in Germany? Assuming they weren’t bringing drugs nor crime, and weren’t rapists, what else made them so different from the Mexicans who, in your own words, have “lots of problems”, though “some, [you] assume, are good people”?

Background:

You have never consumed alcohol, in large part thanks to your beloved brother’s alcohol addiction, which eventually cost him his life.

Question:

How do you reconcile this personal experience with your brother’s addiction with your extensive business interests in gambling (albeit legal, and in spite of very mixed business results), knowing that gambling is notoriously addictive, especially for people who have “lots of problems”?

Background:

You have an impressive record as a business man, but your record is arguably more impressive as a self-promoting “branded celebrity” — whether or not one believes your own estimate of the value of the Trump brand. At any rate, in the process of doing business, you have done very well for yourself, but not always so well for others — stakeholders, customers and, more importantly, the public at large. You’ve engaged in hundreds of lawsuits, both as defendant and plaintiff, against institutions which, like the presidency of the United States of America, are expected to defend the public’s interests. Your attorney says it’s part of doing business in this country, but let’s mention a few instances to illustrate the point: in 1973 you had your first brush with celebrity because of a violation of the Fair Housing Act in the operation of 39 buildings in New York City. You reached a settlement in 1975 because it didn’t “compel [you] to accept persons on welfare as tenants.” In 2008 you sued the city of Rancho Palos Verdes in California, because of what your lawyer claimed was a “relentless anti-growth municipal ideology.” In 2013 New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a lawsuit accusing you for defrauding more than 5,000 people who were looking to learn your real estate investment techniques in a for-profit training program at Trump University (now Trump Entrepreneur Initiative). This year you took Palm Beach County in Florida to court for “deliberate[ly] and malicious[ly]” redirecting air traffic to the Palm Beach International Airport over your Mar-A-Lago estate. So here’s the

Question:

Is there anything in your track record, in the “art of the deal”, of “survival”, or of “the comeback” that makes you credible to serve in the interest of the people of the United States of America?

Background:

On the topic of your readiness to commit, you have stated that you “just know it’s very hard for them [Ivana and Marla] to compete because [you] do love what [you] do. [You] really love it.” You are in your third marriage, and each time you have made vows to stay by your wives for better or for worse, until death do you part, I suppose. If elected, you will be entering a much more heavily binding agreement with the people of the United States of America.

Question:

Can we expect to successfully compete for your attention?

To conclude on a lighter note:

Inspired by the success of “The Apprentice”, you have filed a trademark application for the catchphrase “You’re fired.”

Question:

If elected, will you be paying The Trump Organization royalties when you fire White House staff, or will you just come up with another equally original catchphrase?

Caveat: the facts stated herein are all from Wikipedia, each referenced to its original source in the Wikipedia entry on Donald Trump. I have limited my input to raising questions that these facts bring to mind.