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We don’t like QA, but you can work here

How the last bullet in a job description told me everything about the company’s “culture”

  • Ability to maintain enthusiasm of their team and promote a positive atmosphere, despite what is a somewhat ‘negative’ process.

The above bullet was listed in a Quality Assurance Manager position. Just to make sure I didn’t miss something I viewed other available positions within the company to see if this bullet existed. I viewed a project management role, a designer role, a developer role, and a business analyst role. Just as I had assumed this bullet did not exist in any of the other roles.

To be clear, I love every part of the bullet, other than what follows the comma. I think that no matter what your department is within a company, if you are management you should always be dedicated to keeping the enthusiasm going with your team. As well as promoting a positive atmosphere. I feel that anyone who feels otherwise is not management material. Having said that, i’m wondering why any company would put out a job description, but refer to the role as “somewhat of a ‘negative’ process”. As someone trying to get an understanding of the company’s culture by reading the job description and comparing it to others, that immediately tells me this company does not hold Quality Assurance professionals in high regard. It also tells me that it doesn’t train it’s other employees to do so either. Simply because they have to warn QA candidates to “Keep hope alive” in this negative process.

In my career i’ve worked for various companies full-time and contract. Some had great admiration for the QA teams, some didn’t and some grew to love QA as time went on. However, in most cases a QA professional knows what they are dealing with by simply taking on the role. We know the stigma. However, if the person writing the job description immediately feels the need to call QA a ‘negative’ process, that immediately lets you know that the culture is possibly 10 times worse than any company culture you’ve ever dealt with in your QA Career. Well at least that is what it tells a seasoned professional. So I guess the heads up is awesome?!

As someone who has been in Quality Assurance for 9 years i’d like to say that if you are releasing anything to the public QA should be a priority. It should not be looked at as a negative process or an afterthought. It should be looked at as an opportunity to properly brand your product and build your company’s brand reputation. I personally take great offense to someone referring to it as a ‘negative’ process.

However, if it’s your company you have every right to post a job description exactly they way you want, but insulting a profession may not be the best way to gather talent.

My advice for anyone who considers QA to be a negative process, i’d recommend cleaning up your company’s culture and reading some of my other articles below.

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/number-1-reason-to-become-a-software-quality-assurance-professional-you-are-allowed-to-have-multiple-personalities/

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/software-testing-terms-you-may-not-be-familiar-with/

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/understanding-why-you-really-perform-cross-browser-testing/

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/quality-assurance-professionals-play-football-at-work-our-position-offensive-linemen-right-tackle/

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/a-war-a-manifesto-respect-courage-and-some-barking-scrum-just-got-real-part-2/

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/how-to-show-your-worth-during-your-qa-interview/

https://www.blacksintechnology.net/career-advice-for-entry-level-software-testers/