While Amazon clearly mortally wounded Borders, Barnes & Noble, and the like, the smaller, independent bookstores are now thriving in this world. So should we be upset about what Amazon did?
The Whale
M.G. Siegler
1.1K20

Sweet. A friend and I called that one day over coffee. Retro economics, we called it. This was back in 2013:

The same week my friend had called me, another friend and I were sitting in a niche coffee/wine bar — just the kind that could survive next to a Starbucks — and discussing the closure of another Barnes and Noble. We remembered the Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan reunion flick, You’ve Got Mail, which used the reality of giant bookstores putting the little niche bookshops out of business as the scaffold for the plot. But then the colossus, Amazon, and e-readers came along. The big bookstores added coffee shops but continued to lose revenue. They patnered with companies like Paper Chase and tried to prop up store revenue with stationary and stocking stuffers. It didn’t work. Now the companies that will thrive are Amazon, the colossus, and the niche shop — the little mystery bookshop with the good coffee, inviting seating area, and Tuesday and Thursday night mystery dinner theater.
So will it be with news. There is, and always will be, a hunger for no-gimmick, in depth reporting.
We seek substance and connection. In the new tech world, someone will eventually figure out how to facilitate it and gain a large and influencial following for the effort.
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