While Australia’s election season is less than two months, America’s election season is virtually perpetual

There needs to be serious discussion about how to shorten the American election season while still allowing for robust voter participation in the political process

For the first time in 29 years, Australia is holding a double dissolution election, in which all seats in both houses of the bicameral Australian Parliament are up for election. The election, which was officially called for on May 8, will take place on July 2, meaning that Australia’s election season will officially last for 1 month, 3 weeks, and 3 days.

Australia’s short campaign season is in sharp contrast with the campaign season (particularly in regard to presidential elections) in the United States, which is virtually perpetual. While elections for major-party presidential nominations here in the U.S. have been ongoing for three months now, and several states have held major-party nominations for seats in both houses of the U.S. Congress, and it will be another couple of months before major-party presidential nominees are officially nominated, with the U.S. general election scheduled for November 8.

While the U.S. has a campaign season that seemingly starts as soon as the last election is over, Australia has a campaign season that will last less than two months. Personally, I believe that we should take a serious look at reforming the election process here in America so that campaign season isn’t virtually perpetual, while continuing to allow the American people the same level, or even more, participation in the political process. If anyone has any ideas to make the American campaign season shorter, feel free to leave a comment with your ideas.