My Forthcoming Book on Artificial Intelligence & Robotics Policy

  • Chapter 2: The Importance of Policy Defaults for Innovation Culture — Every technology policy debate involves a choice between two general defaults: the precautionary principle and the proactionary principle or “permissionless innovation.” Setting the initial legal default for AI technologies closer to the green light of permissionless innovation will enable greater entrepreneurialism, investment, and global competitiveness.
  • Chapter 3: Decentralized Governance for AI: A Framework — The process of embedding ethics in AI design is an ongoing, iterative process influenced by many forces and factors. There will be much trial and error when devising ethical guidelines for AI and hammering out better ways of keeping these systems aligned with human values. A top-down, one-size-fits-all regulatory framework for AI is unwise. A more decentralized, polycentric governance approach is needed — nationally and globally. [This chapter is the meat of the book and several derivative articles will be spun out of it beginning with a report on algorithmic auditing and AI impact assessments.]
  • Chapter 4: The US Governance Model for AI So Far — U.S. digital technology and ecommerce sectors have enjoyed a generally “permissionless” policy environment since the early days of the Internet, and this has greatly benefited our innovation and global competitiveness. While AI has thus far been governed by a similar “light-touch” approach, many academics and policymakers are now calling for aggressive regulation of AI rooted in a precautionary principle-oriented mindset, which threatens to derail a great deal of AI innovation.
  • Chapter 5: The European Regulatory Model & the Costs of Precaution by Default — Over the past quarter century, the European Union has taken a more aggressive approach to digital technology and data regulation, and is now advancing several new comprehensive regulatory frameworks, including an AI Act. The E.U.’s heavy-handed regulatory regime, which is rooted in the precautionary principle, discouraged innovation and investment across the continent in the past and will continue to do so as it grows to encompass AI technologies. The U.S. should reject this model and welcome European innovators looking to escape it.
  • Chapter 6: Existential Risks & Global Governance Issues around AI & Robotics — AI and robotics could give rise to certain global risks that warrant greater attention and action. But policymakers must be careful to define existential risk properly and understand how it is often the case that the most important solution to such risks is more technological innovation to overcome those problems. The greatest existential risk of all would be to block further technological innovation and scientific progress. Proposals to impose global bans or regulatory agencies are both unwise and unworkable. Other approaches, including soft law efforts, will continue to play a role in addressing global AI risks and concerns.

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