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The candidates to beat? From left are Yemi Osinbajo and Muhammadu Buhari of the ruling All Progressives Congress, and Atiku Abubakar and Peter Obi of the Peoples Democratic Party. Nigeria votes on 16 February 2019.

Claim: Eight claims by Nigeria’s leading candidates for the presidency.

Source: Televised town hall meetings

Verdict: A range of verdicts ranging from correct and incorrect to unproven.

Researched by Africa Check, Nigeria

This week, Nigerians will elect a president. They are spoilt for choice: the official list has 73 names for the presidency, though some have since dropped out or endorsed others.

The ruling All Progressives Congress and opposition Peoples Democratic Party are seen as the parties to beat. …


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President of the African National Congress, Cyril Ramaphosa. Image: Patrick Eriksen

Claim: Five claims about the ruling party’s achievements.

Source: ANC manifesto for the 2019 election.

Verdict: checked

Researched by Liesl Pretorius

South Africa’s ruling political party, the African National Congress, launched its 2019 election manifesto last month.

Taglined “a people’s plan for a better life for all”, the manifesto contains a number of claims about progress in the country.

This report fact-checks five claims about school attendance, housing delivery, the minimum wage, spending on infrastructure and student aid.

Claim: School attendance increased “from 51% in 1994 to 99% today”

Verdict: Incorrect

What percentage of South African children attend school? The…


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Zimbabwean nationals camping at the Beitbridge border ahead of their repatriation following xenophobic attacks in South Africa in April 2015. Photo: AFP/ZINYANGE AUNTONY

Claim: We have got millions of Zimbabweans living in South Africa.

Source: Lindiwe Zulu (January 2019)

Verdict: Unproven

Explainer: No data backs claim, but still uncertainty on origin of migrants in South Africa

  • The ANC’s Lindiwe Zulu said there were “millions of Zimbabweans living in South Africa” and she would like them to help resolve the conflict in their country.
  • Data from Statistics South Africa and the UN puts the number of migrants from Zimbabwe living in South Africa at well under a million.
  • But a UN expert said South Africa was a “very difficult case” when it came to…


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South Africa’s newly-minted president Cyril Ramaphosa arrives to deliver his State of the National address at the Parliament in Cape Town, on February 16, 2018. Photo: GIANLUIGI GUERCIA / POOL / AFP

Claim: Four promises from a 2018 national address.

Source: 2018 state of the nation address.

Verdict: Checked

Two promises kept, one broken and one still in progress.

Researched by Africa Check

President Cyril Ramaphosa is set to deliver South Africa’s annual State of the Nation address tomorrow night in Cape Town. And Africa Check will fact-check the claims he makes, live.

Last year we found Ramaphosa’s claims to be mostly correct (he got two wrong). But what about the promises he made? Have they been kept?

Here we follow up on four of his promises on summits, youth employment, schools…


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Clients are seen at a mobile phone centre in Nairobi, Kenya in November 2018. Photo: AFP/ SIMON MAINA

Claim: An average Kenyan will have to work almost 60 days to afford Apple’s premium iPhone XS.

Source: Capital FM (January 2019)

Verdict: Misleading

Explainer: “Average wage” excludes informal sector workers.

  • A comparison of wages in 42 countries claimed it would take 60 days of work at Kenya’s “average wage” to afford a high-end smartphone.
  • The figure comes from the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. But it applies only to those employed in the formal sector — just 17% of working people.
  • The majority (83%) of employed people work in the informal sector, earning lower wages.

Researched by Vincent Ng’ethe


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Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni is pictured at the African Union headquarters in Ethiopia on 17 January 2019. Photo: AFP/EDUARDO SOTERAS

Claim: Four claims about economic and educational progress in Uganda.

Source: Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni (January 2019)

Verdict: One correct, one mostly correct, one misleading, one incorrect

  • President Yoweri Museveni said Uganda’s economy had grown steadily since 1986, and adult literacy has risen.
  • His claim of 6.3% average economic growth since 1986 was correct, but two other claims about growth were either misleading or incorrect.
  • The president was also mostly correct in his claim about rising adult literacy.

Researched by Alphonce Shiundu

Uganda’s ruling National Resistance Movement has made big strides since 1986, President Yoweri Museveni said in a New…


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The African National Congress’s 2014 election manifesto.

Claims: Three promises made by the ruling party in 2014.

Source: ANC 2014 election manifesto.

Verdict: Checked

Researched by Liesl Pretorius

South Africans have been urged to register to vote ahead of the country’s national and provincial elections.

Africa Check will be fact-checking claims made in the leading parties’ election manifestos. But what about the election promises that were made five years ago? Our promise tracker has checked on commitments made in Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa.

In this report we look at three promises made in the African National Congress’s previous manifesto, released on 11 January 2014. …


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The tweet containing the claim from the Global Citizen movement.

Claim: Over the past few years, hundreds of children have drowned in pit latrines in South Africa

Source: Global Citizen (January 2019)

Verdict: Incorrect

Explainer: Records show four children have died in school pit latrines since 2014. Two drowned while two more died when walls fell on them.

  • Global Citizen, which works to end extreme poverty in the world, said “hundreds” of children had drowned in school pit latrines in South Africa “over the past few years”.
  • Records show two five-year-old children have drowned in school latrines since 2014. …

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A screengrab of the three candidates at the Nigeria presidential debate in Abuja on 19 January 2019. Photo: CHANNELS TELEVISION

Claims: 10 of 12 claims from three Nigerian presidential candidates.

Source: Nigeria’s January 2019 debate.With only weeks to Nigeria’s 2019 elections, campaigning is at fever pitch. It has not been without drama.

Verdict: Checked

Researched by Africa Check

UPDATE: After we had already published this fact-check, the Allied Congress Party of Nigeria candidate, Oby Ezekwesili, announced she was stepping down from the presidential race.

With only weeks to Nigeria’s 2019 elections, campaigning is at fever pitch. It has not been without drama.

On 19 January 2019 the first presidential debate took place in Abuja. There are currently 73 people eyeing…


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A pregnant student poses in this July 2013 photo taken at the Pretoria Hospital School in South Africa. At the time the school accommodated pregnant teenagers. Photo: AFP/STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

Claim: Two claims on teen pregnancy and childbirth in South Africa

Source: KwaZulu-Natal member of the executive committee for health Dr Sibongiseni Dhlomo

Verdict: Checked

Explainer

  • Dr Sibongiseni Dhlomo, head of health in KwaZulu-Natal, said teen pregnancy accounted for up to 10% of births in South Africa, but 45% of maternal deaths during childbirth were of teenagers.
  • In 2017, 10.9% of recorded births were to mothers aged 10 to 19.
  • In the same year, 9.5% of maternal deaths during childbirth were of mothers aged under 20.

Researched by Cayley Clifford and Naphtali Khumalo

Many of the mothers who die during…

Africa Check

Africa’s first independent fact-checking organisation. Launched in 2012 to promote accuracy in public debate & keep politicians honest.

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