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In part 1 of of the money series ‘Money Makes the World Go Round’ we talked about the fact that money functions through the process of projection. We project parts of our identity onto money: everything that we think we are, and everything that we think we are not, or do not have. For example: self-worth, freedom, success, prosperity and even love. Thus, money becomes a projection screen for our deepest desires and darkest secrets.

Basically, there are three different types of projections:

1. The First Type: Negative Projections

The first type is characterized by unconsciously projecting negative qualities or attributes onto money.

Someone with projections of this type might complete the sentence ‘money is…’ with statements such as ‘money stinks, money is dirty, money means responsibility’. …


A hand drawn illustration (by Nadjeschda) of the world circled by banknotes with the text ‘Money makes the world go round’
A hand drawn illustration (by Nadjeschda) of the world circled by banknotes with the text ‘Money makes the world go round’

Money is a projection screen

Even if it often appears otherwise in everyday life, money is only one thing: a medium — physical or virtual — on to which we project, as if onto a neutral screen, our fantasies, desires, and insecurities. You may think this is a bold statement, given that you know for a fact you need money to pay your rent or mortgage, to buy food, to pay for your holiday. So, what do we mean when we say that money exists in this way and functions through the process of projection?

The object which we call Money has its own intrinsic value as being an object in its own right. Its separate monetary value only comes into existence through human projection. We agree that it qualifies as money: how much of it there is and how much of it you need to acquire something else for it. …


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Today, our Spoon Room got hacked and all participants where exposed to horrifying images of child pornography. I don’t need to tell you how awful this was for everyone on the call.

As you can imagine, a few people disconnected in shock, just to protect themselves from what they were forced to see. However, 28 people stayed online and we used the community for its original purpose: to connect and support. And boy did we need it today.

Two insights emerged for me:

  1. Life can be brutal. As much as I would hope it wasn’t true, child abuse and pornography are a fact of life. To be involuntarily confronted with this version of reality made me realise just how safe the bubble in which I exist is and how many people (and children) are out there who need a helping hand and someone to talk to. …

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The outbreak of Covid-19 has clearly turned all our lives upside down. Most of us have come to terms with the new situation, but the quarantine requirements are not pleasant for anyone.

We hear from many clients that they feel lost somewhere in the tension between overwhelm and boredom. The longer the quarantine measures apply, the clearer it becomes that not only is everything different, but many things will likely remain different after the crisis.

GRIEF AS A COLLECTIVE EXPERIENCE
Recently, an article appeared in the Harvard Business Review in which thanatologist and researcher David Kessler (who collaborated with the famous grief researcher Elisabeth Kübler-Ross) puts forward the hypothesis that we are currently undergoing a collective grieving process. Our grief is based on the experience of the loss of security and normality and the even more serious realisation that the once known normality might never return. This insight leads us through, not necessarily in linear order, the six stages of grief: shock, denial, anger, negotiation, depression and acceptance or hope. …


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Organisations worldwide are rightfully alarmed about the threat that the Covid-19 outbreak poses to their own staff. Education and training courses are being cancelled and home office options are being introduced wherever possible. Trainings, conferences and large group events, not even to speak of comprehensive culture transformations, are postponed indefinitely.

But even before the outbreak of the global corona epidemic, many organisations were questioning how much mobility we can allow with a clear conscience. The message of the Fridays for Future movement and other climate activists is clear: Flying is bad and harms the climate — stay at home or take the train. But especially in large organisations, managers are still sent halfway around the world to attend a 3-day event. …


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At the age of sixteen I met God for the first time. As a child of left-wing intellectual and atheist parents, this was a memorable event in my world. Admittedly, this experience was triggered by a small dose of ‘Magic Mushrooms’ I had consumed during a camping trip with friends in the USA. I did not have expectations of what the psychogenic mushrooms would do for me beyond intensifying my perception (especially visually) in the way friends had reported from their trips. My trip turned out differently than I had expected. Not only did I experience an intense connection with all creation in the universe, but also had the feeling of having met an abstract version of God, that revealed itself to me as a felt sense of pure love. …


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Let me tell you about my friend Otto. He is a white Spitz belonging to friends of ours who converted an old castle in the countryside into a small hotel. Otto looks like a canine top-model; his long legs and perfect white fluffy fur make for a distinctly regal appearance. Like any dog, Otto loves being outside and gracefully deems my wife and I to be acceptable walking companions. Having grown up in the countryside, Otto is not accustomed to walking on a leash. For the most part there doesn’t seem to be a need for a leash either since he behaves rather well — that is until he smells a rabbit or a deer. On these occasions there is no stopping him. …


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I recently had a small bite to eat in a restaurant in London. Having travelled in the US extensively, I have gotten used to tipping religiously and always get confused about different tipping rules in other countries. As the waiter charged my credit card, I told him to add two pounds as a tip. He replied that he could only charge the credit card with the exact amount of the check, but that I was of course welcome to leave a tip in cash. …


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According to a Jewish wisdom folktale, King Salomon once lost a chess game to his most trusted advisor, Benaiah Ben Yehoyada. Being a bit of a sore loser, King Salomon decides to teach Benaiah a humbling lesson by assigning him an impossible task: to find him a ring, which has the power to make a happy man sad and a sad man happy. Benaiah is given half a year to produce this magical ring. He searches in every corner of the kingdom, but to no avail. Just as he returns to face the king and admit his failure, Benaiah stumbles into a small and dusty workshop tucked away in a little alley not far from the castle. After one look at the inside of the little store, Benaiah disappointedly turns around to walk away. …


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We have all heard the term stream of thought. If we take this metaphor verbatim this stream of thought represents our capacity to think. Our brain ‘emits’ thought constantly and just as a stream of water flows whether we pay attention to it or not, our brain thinks, whether we pay attention or not.

If the stream is ‘all thought’, what floats in the stream are individual thoughts. …

About

Nadjeschda Taranczewski

Helping CEOs and founders to re-invent their organisation as a Conscious Tribe | Engaged employees | Executive Coaching: www.conscious-u.com

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