I Aim, Therefore I Am

A casual walk down the self-help aisle in any bookshop around the world will showcase hundreds of books that talk about the Law of Attraction, the power of positive thinking and the ability to visualize and manifest all your dreams via a variety of mental tricks and thought control. While “Omnipreneurship” does not have that much in common with those types of books, there is one overwhelming similarity — the call to dream big.

Richard Branson once said, “Dream big by setting yourself seemingly impossible challenges. Then you have to catch up with them.” It’s not enough to simply have a big dream, but rather, to create an organized approach to achieve it. One of Omnipreneurship’s central tools — the Life Plan — calls on the individual to map out their personal finish line across a variety of categories to help realize their goals, create impact and contribute to the greater good. It is also, the perfect representation of Omnipreneurship’s first golden rule of “I Aim, Therefore I Am”, which calls for defining measurable, timely and soaring finish lines to create the right kind of pressure — what I call the purifying pressure — to deliver results. Having these stretched goals to aspire and work towards is a key to unlocking the power of Omnipreneurship.

The Life Plan consists of ten categories that represent a comprehensive cross-section of life, each with its own Life Goal, two mid-term 2020 goals and three annual goals that contribute to the larger goal. It’s quite prescriptive (which we consider a key strength), and it has a complementary flexibility built into it, allowing for a total Life Plan refresh at the end of each year. I believe in the power of the Life Plan as it represents something of a blueprint for your future and a guide to ensuring that you are present and mindful of all that needs to be achieved.

I’ve been following my own Life Plan since the age of 27 and in fact, most members of my extended family, colleagues at Al-Dabbagh Group and thousands of learners of my leadership course at Philanthropy University, have completed one. Each year, I have the deep privilege of coaching learners in the exercise of completing a Life Plan and creating an execution method for it. I always come away humbled by the enormous ambition, goodwill and urge by scores of people from across continents who want to live their lives in the service of building a better world.

Understandably, and perhaps where the real challenge lies, are the skeptics who question the notion of planning, who wave the flag of spontaneity and the unknown and critique the Life Plan for being unrealistic. What if I fail to achieve it? What if I want to change my Life Goals? What if I want to live free as a bird and simply blown by the wind? The good news is that if we fail to achieve our dreams there is no penalty and won’t be thrown in jail. When it comes to changing one’s goals, growing and evolving — the Life Plan is alive — needing to be refreshed annually. And finally, for those who want to remain free — we have seen that you can indeed be blowing in the wind while achieving your dreams at the same time.

In Omnipreneurship, I mention, “This is all to say that it’s really important to hold the goals lightly. Aim for them, but don’t beat yourself up if you don’t achieve them, or don’t achieve them in the time that you hope. This is an important point, too — don’t let time be the enemy. You want to try to achieve things within a certain time frame, but you need to forgive yourself if that doesn’t happen. For example, I wanted to have finished writing this book two years ago. It’s now in your hands, but it took me longer than expected to get there.”

This year, after refreshing my Life Plan, I’ve already seen so many of my annual goals start to come to fruition and it inspires me to keep going the distance to achieve them and create balance, harmony and productivity across all aspects of my life.

To download your own Life Plan and get a copy of “Omnipreneurship” please visit amraldabbagh.com