Compilation of JOUR 207 work

News Brief

UNR Spending Focuses on Faculty Salaries (Feb. 2)

In the fiscal year 2015–216, The University of Nevada, Reno had a $205,017,122 budget where 55.1 percent of it was spent on instruction. This is a 36.8 percent increase since 2013.

High quality faculty members are of utmost importance to university officials, especially with a rise in student enrollment and a need for more professors.

“Being able to be competitive in faculty and in salaries is essential” said Bruce Shively, UNR’s associate vice president for planning, budget, and analysis in a classroom interview conducted on January 30.

University officials plan to hire another 100 faculty members as soon as possible.

New York Times Editor Visits RSJ (Feb. 9)

A forum on Wednesday Feb. 8 with Dean Baquet, executive editor of the world-renowned New York Times, took place in the university’s Joe Crowley Student Union at 1 p.m.

Students, professors, and local Reno residents gathered to question and discuss the newspaper’s recent coverage on the newly elected administration.

Fake news and controversial articles written about President Donald Trump were the hot topic.

“I try to make sure that people don’t know where I stand on politics” said Baquet during the event.

He addressed personal decisions he recently made in releasing or withholding certain stories. The disputable actions he has taken and public statements he has made about the new president were also addressed.

Attendees were also interested in Baquet’s personal advice to aspiring journalists.

“Read, understand history, be open to craft,” said Baquet.

He admitted that he accidentally stumbled upon journalism when given a summer internship opportunity.

The 60-year-old journalist acknowledged that he oversees approximately 1,300 employees, and has been a part of newspapers located in Chicago, Los Angeles, and currently New York. The number of New York Times digital readers in the past nine years has increased 14.2 percent, according the Nieman Lab.

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