Session with Oli (24th Feb)

Sort your instagram out — public not private, #, consistent online persona representative of the area you’re interested in; post similar photos on each social media.

If you like a website, find out: who made it?

Be contactable — contact details, bio etc.

Choose a web platform & pay for a web developer — eg squarespace £5 a month, wix is free & simple, behance, indexhibit is free but complicated, stacey ap is techy, cargocollective is recommended, folio drop, dunked, carbonmade is ‘horrible, awkward, weird’, dropr, format is $5.75 a month. Choose your website based on what fits in with other, similar photographers. Facebook is more for the public / clients than for agencies.

FLASH WEBSITES DON’T WORK ON APPLE.

Choose your approach and stick to it — 100% professional vs casual etc.

What does an assistant’s website look like?

Contains info about their work / capabilities. Has different sections to show variety, tearsheets — where is your work existing in the real world?? eg magazine spreads. Link to all social media. Who are their clients? How do they get them?

Use the AOP search feature, make your website similar to others.

‘It’s amazing how bad some people’s websites are’.

Look at your competition.

What agency is the photographer with? email them — what do they look for? What other photographers do they use?

Flaws: agency websites without their photographers work, photographers who are hard to find — eg other websites / artists with similar name.

Nadav Kander — ‘shit website but does he need it?’

Business cards — vista print, moo, printed.com. Think about your brand — ‘the simpler the better’. Single sided business card with name & website on one side, photo on another; make a few — use different image on each set and hand out relevant one eg wedding for potential clients.

Chase Jarvis, Emma Light, Dormer Durling, Adrian Myers, Jamie Sweetlove, Devils gate media, Brendan Barry, Gregory Crewsdon, Jeff Krol, Alex Bailey, Emily Maye.

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