Dixie’s Last Day….

The decision has been made. South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed the bill to remove the confederate flag off state grounds and the Flag was taken down Friday, July 10. A day many South Carolinian's will forever remember as a part of their history good or bad. For some they will remember it as a wrong finally corrected with the flag representing the hate and injustice that shamefully South Carolina has been known for in certain times and events in history over past 150 years. Others look at Friday July, 10 as a day of sorrow, that their “heritage” will no longer represent the future of South Carolina. So as the crowd formed at the state capitol Friday July 10, people gathering together differing in opinion one thing everyone could agree on was that it was Dixie’s last day at the state capitol.

An article in USA Today shows a video of the small ceremony of the confederate flag being taken by the Highway Patrol Honor guards. Governor Haley promised that the flag would be dismantled with honor and dignity and those seven guards did just that. The atmosphere of the crowd was electric. Ongoing chants of “ take it down” and “USA” filled the air, and once the flag was on its way to the State museum it had a departure song/chant as well … “Na Na Na Na…Hey Hey Hey….Goodbye”. So the people of South Carolina finally got the victory that some have been awaiting far before the tragic event of the Emanuel Nine that helped catapult the issue onto the main agenda of South Carolina legislature.

Civil Rights Activist Jesse Jackson was among the crowd of supports that watched history take place on that Friday. Jackson spoke of his own personal history and battles he endured with racial injustices that many believe the confederate flag represented. Jackson gave praise to Governor Haley for the caring and compassion she showed toward the Emanuel Nine family members, and how well she lead the victory of legislator passing the Bill to remove the flag.

Indeed it was a great and historic day for South Carolina. It puts the state in an interesting position possibly being a role model for correcting past injustices. Though the more interesting thought will be who else will follow their lead ?

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