When Basic Income Was Almost an American Reality
Joel Dodge
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The problem with most reform plans is the same as any humanist philosophy: putting humans first and then trying to come up with a sustainable way to address resource issues. Poverty is a resource problem, not an empathy or kindness problem. Poor people are not considered as resources because they don’t have any money, so a money-worshiping system doesn’t see them. In order for humanity to survive the long term, they need food, water, shelter and all of the natural resources that support those things. Instead of a basic income or a job that’s integral to consuming resources, every human’s first priority should be to do something that adds to the natural resource base. From that flow of labors, there is plenty of room for skimming and creating wealth that ultimately flows toward the future, rather than debts that accelerate resource consumption. In other words, farmers and park services should be the recipients of all of our wealth, and since these are jobs that require hands and brains, there is plenty of room for people to be useful at them. All of our other efforts should be in support of their labors, just as every manager of a company should be working to improve the workforce quality and efficiency. The difference is that the end game is useful and creative instead of useless and consumptive.

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