Bedrosian Bookclub: The Death of Expertise

Tom Nichols’ The Death of Expertise is a broad look at the antipathy toward “experts” and “expertise” among the citizenry of contemporary United States. Nichols contends that this antipathy is dangerous for our democracy, that this distrust not only makes for unhealthy conversation but damages both political and public relationships with the very experts’ guidance.

We discuss the argument, the nature of expertise, the role of the academic in civic education, and the state of civics in general. Find out if we liked this book and who we think should read it. If you haven’t read it yet, spoiler alert — we do assume you’ve read it!

Featuring Richard Green (@keynesianr), Aubrey Hicks (@AubreyHi), Pamela Clouser McCann, Anthony Orlando (@AnthonyWOrlando), and Jan Perry (@JanPerry)

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Special thanks to Oxford University Press for review copies.

@OUPAcademic

To listen to the Bedrosian Book Club discussion of The Death of Expertise click the orange arrow in the Soundcloud player on this post. Or you can download it and subscribe through ApplePodcasts, Soundcloud, or Google Play


Links & further reading:

Why the Scariest Nuclear Threat May be Coming from Inside the White House by Michael Lewis in Vanity Fair
 Obamacare repeal: Watch McCain vote no
 The Ethics of Governing, Our American Discourse interview with Lisa Schweitzer
 The Tyranny of the Meritocracy: Democratizing Higher Education in America by Lani Guinier
 FiveThirtyEight
 Our American Discourse — podcast
 Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
 The Death of Expertise, article in The Federalist

Next Month …

The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich is part true crime part memoir. The author writes “It’s about a murder, it is about my family, it is about other families whose lives were touched by the murder. But more than that, it is about how we understand our lives, the past, and each other. To do this, we all make stories.

Read along with us! Let us know what you think of the book or the podcasts at Facebook or Twitter.


Originally published at bedrosian.usc.edu on August 29, 2017.

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