Supporting Rabbit in their Quest to Make TV Social — Once Again

By: Jeremy Levine and Talia Goldberg

Years ago, everyone watched television shows at the same time — when they aired, sometimes huddled around a living room screen. Think about TV’s greatest moments: the Super Bowl, the Beatles debut on Ed Sullivan, a flubbed Best Picture Oscars winner announcement and iconic series finales like M.A.S.H., Seinfeld, or the Sopranos. These all elevated to become cultural moments because the content was fantastic, and the added element of social relevance made them unmissable.

Today, content is still king. Some say we’re in a Platinum Age for television where there’s more content than ever, and it’s higher quality than ever. However, as this content moves online, it is consumed differently than before — on-demand, and often viewed individually on small, mobile screens — but the social side of television is lacking. Other media verticals in this digital age have created better consumer experiences by marrying content with social — Instagram made photography social; Twitch made gaming social; Twitter made news social — yet a social TV and movie experience lags behind. Why is that?

We believe this is because the technology required to deliver a perfectly in-sync viewing experience is wickedly hard. If you’re watching a sports game or a comedy with friends across the Internet, even a half-second delay while watching a critical play or a joke’s punchline can ruin the viewing experience.

That’s why we’re excited about Rabbit. It’s why we invested in and joined the Board. Rabbit is the way to watch anything with anyone over the Internet while socializing around the content. The team has developed a reliable, scalable way to stream shows or movies perfectly in-sync whether it is for two people on opposite coasts or hundreds of people around the world.

Rabbit’s users offer proof that this is an experience people crave: 3.6 million monthly active users tune in and watch an average of 12.5 hours on Rabbit every month with friends. When a user has 5 or more friends also using Rabbit, this number jumps to an average of 28.5 hours a month, which is more time than is spent on many of the world’s most valuable consumer internet platforms including Instagram and Snapchat.[1]

Perhaps the most intriguing thing about Rabbit, though, is that zero marketing dollars have fueled its growth and usage. It’s all completely organic because users who enjoy Rabbit bring their friends along to try it.

Bessemer is thrilled to support founder Philippe Clavel, CEO Amanda Richardson, and the entire Rabbit team as they extend their reach to consumers around the globe.

[1] https://www.recode.net/2018/6/25/17501224/instagram-facebook-snapchat-time-spent-growth-data