2019 Bond: Better schools make a better community

I don’t have children in school, how will the bond impact me?

When some residents without students in school look at a school bond measure, they only see the dollar signs attached to it, thinking the taxes are the only thing that will impact them if the measure passes.

While a successful bond will dramatically increase the educational lives of students and their families, for community members with no students in school, there are benefits as well.

Improvements to local schools can positively impact the local economy by creating new jobs, improving property values, improving traffic flow and making the community safer. Also, it goes without saying, that a better quality of education will lead to a better-skilled workforce in the future.

Some research even shows that the passage of a school bond measure “causes housing prices in the district to rise by about six percent.”

Building Community

Good schools help make our neighborhoods more attractive to families and young professionals moving to the area. When you buy a house, you are also “buying” all the characteristics associated with that home and neighborhood, including local school performance, access to parks and shopping, and local crime rates. That’s why one of the first questions home buyers ask is about the local schools. Realtors have even been known to mention the local school districts to help advertise a home’s location.

“K-12 education has an impact both on the economy and the community … If people were awakened to these simple facts, they might become more involved in the tough decisions and the hard work of improving schools, and actually make it happen.” — George W. Bush Presidential Center.

The Bethel area is growing, not only with new homes and families, but with new businesses as well. Those companies are also shopping around to find the best location. They need a good customer base, as well as top quality employees, which includes many of our high school students, while they’re in school, or after graduation.

It’s been said, “You don’t need a crystal ball to evaluate a neighborhood’s direction.” There are two criteria, access to jobs and access to amenities, like good public schools.