9 Tips To Keep Your Winery Newsletter Fresh

BTN Examines the “Must Have” Components in your Winery’s Email Marketing Campaign

It’s no secret that every email account has countless emails that go unopened and end up progressing further and further down the cue until they finally disappear amongst the ocean of other messages that were left unattended to. That doesn’t mean that your newsletter has to be one of them. Here are 9 tips to get your winery email marketing campaign right:

1. Make First Appearances Count — Use a proper Name and a well thought out summary in your Email’s Subject Line and Preview Text.

It’s no secret that every email account has countless emails that go unopened and end up progressing further and further down the cue until they finally disappear amongst the ocean of other messages that were left unattended to. That doesn’t mean that your newsletter has to be one of them.

Above all, make sure your readers know that the email is from you! Properly fill out the NAME section that your email service provides and that the name you use is easily recognizable. Sending emails without a proper name associated with it will confuse your subscribers and hold them back from opening up your newsletter.

Don’t leave the Subject until the last minute. Well thought out subject lines are much more likely to be opened than those you leave until the very end. Make sure that your subject line is an attention-grabber. If you know that you have a significant number of Gmail users on your mailing list you can take advantage of the fact that your first few lines of text in the email will be shown after the email’s subject prompt in their inbox. Use clever combinations of subject and intro text to make the most of this feature. Together they should be captivating enough to lure your reader into opening your email.

EuropWines takes advantage of the fact that their recipients are looking for European Wines. They highlight the similarities between their name and email subject in an easy to follow and friendly manner. Try using the same formula for your emails. For example, if your name is ‘Roots Winery’ and your email is highlighting this year’s vintage, use a subject line like “From the roots to the fruit: This year’s vintage.”

2. Use Graphics to Engage with Your Audience

The layout and content of your email should be provocative. Emails with striking images immediately catch the reader’s attention and give them a reason to keep reading. Collaborate with your direct marketing team and use photos that agree with your branding. Once you have decided on the layout of graphics you can go to your tech side and get them to write your email in HTML to make the layout into a working email. Get creative with the text and make your next a newsletter a knockout nobody will want to ignore when they check their inbox.

The Vines of Mendoza Newsletter uses a colorful picture of their vineyards to entice readers into spending a few minutes in their newsletter.

3. Give your recipient different options to engage — not everybody is looking to buy right now!

If you highlight a number of calls to action (links) in your email then your reader will have a variety of reasons to find their way to your website. Giving your subscriber several choices in every email is a great way to introduce them to the different programs you offer.

Villa Mansa — a luxury boutique wine hotel in the heart of Argentina wine country — offers their subscribers 6 different article subjects for their members to read up on. Ultimately, these links all lead back to their website where they can see what other great deals are on offer.

4. Limit your Calls to Action

It may sound contradictory after just reading the section about how you should give your readers multiple calls to action, but sometimes less is more. If you have an important upcoming event don’t overwhelm your subscribers with other news pieces. If the news can stand alone then do everything you can to highlight it — Keep your newsletter strikingly simple! A well thought-out picture and a clever tag line can be very effective.

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