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Brecke Latham Boyd originally published this blog on her website, BreckeBoyd.com.

No one saw it coming, and then no one could escape it — the #MeToo movement spread unstoppably into every fathomable corner of the internet, every single industry, and literally countless thought pieces about women’s and gender relations.

Sparked by barrage of bombshell stories about high-profile individuals publicly accused of sexual harassment or assault, the #MeToo movement encouraged individuals, by and large women, to share their stories and experience being harassed or touched against their will. The slogan itself was started by activist Tarana Burke to bring attention to the commonness of sexual assault and harassment despite its receiving remarkably little attention in local, national, or global news. …


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HR professionals across nearly every industry will tell young graduates that, fresh out of college, hardly anybody cares about your GPA, and after your first job, almost nobody even cares about what your degree actually is in. Rather, it’s more about the skills you’ve amassed, your likeability, your clarity in communications, and your references. In some fields, knowledge obtained during college remains relevant for years to come — for example, fields like history and mathematics likely won’t experience many monumental shifts in the way they’re taught or perceived. …


This story originally appeared on Brecke’s Media Literacy blog, BreckeBoyd.net.

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On the popular question and answer forum Quora, one user asked, “Is there any time fake new is a good thing?” Naturally, many Americans’ knee-jerk reaction is “absolutely not.” In the US, we highly value the verifiable and documented truth, and as such, we hold our journalists to extremely high standards, both legally and societally. When we discover that a journalist has been spreading false information, they face both the courts of law and a public crucifixion of their reputations. …


This blog originally appeared on Brecke Latham Boyd’s personal blog, BreckeBoyd.net

Among those most vulnerable to falling for the fake news epidemic are young people in middle school and high school who don’t have the real-world experience yet to discern factual reporting from sensationalized nonsense. Some schools have begun to include classes in news and media literacy to help students think critically about bias, narrative, and “end goal” for the viewer, and it seems to be helping to create a stronger generation of media consumers, but we need more, and we need it now.

Buzzfeed recently polled school-aged students on their sensitivity to fake and sensationalized news to get a sense of where we are now and what work still needs to be done. The same way that most people would classify themselves as good drivers, most young people classify themselves as adept at identifying fake news. Buzzfeed partnered with the social media app After School whose target audience is exclusively grade school students. In all, 39,000 students completed the survey. In its analysis, Buzzfeed admits that its poll likely does not meet the standards of scientific rigor, since any student with the app could submit answers and there’s no way to determine the authenticity of the answers, but the responses are still worth noting. …


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Brecke Latham Boyd originally published this piece on her blog, BreckeBoyd.net.

Fake news: otherwise known as the two words nearly everyone has heard ad nauseam for the past several months. However, in spite of its inherently annoying nature, this phrase represents a very real problem in our society — and others around the world.

Sometime in 2015, articles with long, somewhat seedy titles began popping up all over Facebook users’ news feeds. This lower form of online journalism, also known as clickbait, was created to generate high volumes of web traffic to otherwise irrelevant websites with questionable URLs. …


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As it turns out, today’s young internet users are woefully unprepared to tease apart the real news from the fake news. Stanford did a study to determine how well students in particular could discern the truth from the fabricated. Many were unable to articulate the importance of the blue “verified” checkmark next to certain twitter accounts. Now, teachers are beginning to take action to ensure that their students are equipped to vet the validity of certain sources on their own and aren’t duped by the landmines set across social media.

Below are some basic tips that will help you determine the validity of certain news…

About

Brecke Latham Boyd

Brecke Boyd is a PR, Media Relations, and Communications Expert. Capitol Hill. International Law Firms. Media Literacy Advocate. http://BreckeBoyd.net

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