Sales Basics — The List

In no particular order, here are my top 30 basic sales rules that will serve as topics for posts in the near future as I get this blog some actual readers:

1. Your product is the star of the show. Know it well.

2. Study your prospect before making contact. Know their business and history.

3. People buy from people they like.

4. Be the person the buyer wants you to be. Mirror them.

5. Start memorable. Stay memorable.

6. Always be approachable. Always be interested.

7. Never act desperate, unless you are.

8. Find the buyer’s pride points. Relate them to the sale.

9. Offer to do more than what is expected.

10. Keep the buyer saying Yes.

11. Position yourself as an educator/authority. Be an industry advocate/evangelist.

12. Destroy all acronyms and words with negative connotation.

13. Admit when you don’t know. Find the answer. Close with it.

14. Keep the conversation 65% buyer / 35% seller.

15. Ask open-ended questions to keep building a database of buying wants/needs.

16. Solution ≠ Product. Speak to their pain by presenting solutions to problems.

17. Note and constantly reference the core selling points.

18. Use examples to explain benefits.

19. Dismiss the competition as inferior or jealous. Never take the bait to bash.

20. Close on every contact by asking for the final decision.

21. Always give a specific time to reconnect instead of a vague timeframe. Set an appointment.

22. Leave your full name and contact information twice on all voicemails.

23. Follow up with a purpose. Never just ‘touch base’ or ‘check in’.

24. There is no substitute for persistence.

25. If it’s not documented, then you didn’t do it.

26. Eye contact and a handshake will get you in the door. Empathy will keep you there.

27. If you can’t make a physical connection, make up for it with sincerity over the phone.

28. Constantly seek referrals. Every prospect is an opportunity for additional prospects.

29. Honor the process and review your checklist constantly.

30. Proactively contact customers to maintain the relationship.


Originally published at trainmysalesteam.blogspot.com on November 4th, 2008.

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