I’ve read and re-read this and I can’t quite work out your point.
Mark Jennings
21

“for most people the concept of buying in London is as far from reality as going to the moon. Why exactly can’t people share their frustration at that?”

I never mentioned buying, I was talking about renting. Of course, it’s expensive and difficult (hence Londoners’ guilt) to live here but millions of people from all over the world come to live here and make a go of it, without the bank of mum and dad. For many careers, it’s an essential move. If you spend all your time telling people in the rest of the UK there’s no way to make it here, of course it will increase resentment and lower social mobility. The Guardian (for example) will write a million articles based on the rents in Hackney as though that’s the whole of London. Meanwhile, there is a world beyond zone 2 which is still affordable.

“Each area in the UK is fighting tooth and nail to get eyes on their successes but the interest is limited to the locality unless it’s a slow news day.”

Yes, that’s my point. It shouldn’t be.

“self actualisation is the top of the pyramid, I suspect most struggling Londoners are hardly there yet.”

Self-actualisation is a journey, not a state of being. But it’s a journey that’s a hell of a lot harder in Hull.

Forgive me for making it personal, but your bio says:

“English born, Scots raised, Irish passport-holder living in London.

I founded and run Shaken — The best cocktails you’ve ever made. Also TechBikers — cycling for good and also the drinks tasting and experience company Drinks Galore.

I have been working in digital since modems — recognising and capitalising on emerging platforms for brands from Pernod Ricard, to Sky and Jimmy Choo”

So how much of that stuff do you think you could / would have achieved had you stayed in your home town rather than moved to London? You are the epitome of the London self-actualiser. And by starting your intro with (I paraphrase) ‘I may sound like an irredeemable London hipster, but I haven’t forgotten my roots’ you’re betraying a little bit of Londoners’ guilt there.

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