Meet Amber.

BurstIQ
BurstIQ
Sep 28, 2017 · 5 min read

Since 2015, BurstIQ has been working to make the world a healthier place by empowering individuals to take control of their data. It is a bold dream and a challenging mission, but we’re grateful for the friends, advisors and partners we have met along the way. American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead once said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” The team at BurstIQ may not be large, but we’re diverse in expertise and united in our commitment to improving healthcare for generations to come.

To tell you more about the people driving our mission, we’ll be sharing weekly posts spotlighting different members of our core team, giving you a perspective of life at BurstIQ, our industry insights, and hopes for the future.

Today, we kick off with Amber, our corporate development lead.

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What made you want to join the team at BurstIQ?

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I found out about BurstIQ in early 2016 and immediately loved the concept. In my former life, I ran the innovation center for a large health system, and I worked with mobile app developers before that, so I’ve seen a lot of tech. But as soon as I learned about BurstIQ, I knew they were something special. Plus, Frank is just a really good guy. He has a lot of integrity and he truly cares about people. I think that’s one of the most important pieces of building a good team and culture.

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What is unique about the BurstIQ culture?

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Frank isn’t trying to just build a corporate environment — he’s building a family. He and Brian brought on people they’ve known and worked with for years, so the team already knows how to function together. As a startup, we’re all trying to figure things out that we’ve never done before. Each of us will have some wins and some mistakes. The trick is to celebrate each other’s wins and have each other’s backs when we fail.

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What are the biggest opportunities for blockchain in healthcare?

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There is so much health data generated all over the place, and it just keeps skyrocketing. Just one genomic test can generate 800–1,000 GB of data, and a person may have a personalized medicine test done several times over the course of their life — the scale of that is mind-boggling. Traditional data storage methods aren’t going to be able to handle it. The problem is made even more complex by two factors: one, the data is constantly being modified, and two, health services are becoming more distributed between different providers, applications, telemedicine and IoT, which means data sharing is more necessary and yet harder to do. All of that, plus complex regulatory requirements on tracking, sharing, use, etc. No biggie, right? But I think the most compelling opportunity is the possibility for blockchain to let people join the value stream. There are so many companies making (or saving) money from your data. They analyze it to reduce costs, to maximize revenue, to figure out how to get you to buy more products, show you better ads, get you to use their product more, and on and on. You and I don’t see a dime of that. We’re trying to change that. We want people to get value from their own data in the same way that companies do — except you are in control.

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What is the biggest barrier behind the industry’s adoption of blockchain, how does BurstIQ address that challenge?

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It’s so new. Especially in the healthcare space, most people don’t even know what it is, let alone how it can help them. And the healthcare industry is notoriously risk-averse. For the most part, that’s a good thing — you’re dealing with people’s lives, after all. But it can make it challenging for new technologies to get adopted. We’re addressing that in a couple of ways. First, we have great relationships with a few health systems who really get what we’re doing. Those partnerships will reduce the adoption risk for other health systems. Second, the platform is being adopted by lots of other players in the health space — insurers, employers, benefits brokers, and soon, individual consumers. This will create a market pull that we believe will accelerate adoption by health systems.

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What does the future of healthcare look like

through your lens?

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I think it looks a lot like the retail space: a combination of brick and mortar and online marketplaces. Retailers know their customers intimately because they use purchase data, demographic data, browsing data, and other data sources to understand exactly what their customers want, when they want it and how much they’re willing to pay for it. Similar to the retail space, I think the health ecosystem will use data to provide people with more choices and greater control over what health services they choose to spend their money on. At BurstIQ, our goal is to make sure consumers are in control of that process and that people can gain value from their own data.

BurstIQ

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