Zero compassion towards problems
Jonas Ellison
437

Oh, gosh, I see where you’re coming from, Jonas, but it feels awfully black and white put this way.

I watched an interview between Maya Angelou and a young black comedian who had declined a $50,000,000 contract because he didn’t fancy selling his soul. In the interview they got onto the whole issue of how best a black person should respond to the injustices they witness. She encouraged him to make a distinction between anger and bitterness. “Feel angry,” she said, “but don’t be bitter. Bitterness eats away at you.”

In one of the Conversations with God books, Neale Donald Walsh talks about the distinction between the “natural emotions” and those that become distorted because the natural emotion hasn’t been expressed and released naturally. So, if not allowed to be felt and expressed, for example, natural anger becomes “unnatural” rage.

So, no — zero compassion doesn’t ring true to me. Natural compassion, naturally expressed, so that it doesn’t become warped into pity and despair.

Hopefully I can feel and express natural compassion for somebody who has locked themselves in a story of victimhood, without buying into that story myself.

There are spiritual disciplines that do aim at an absolute transcendence of human emotion, but, for me, that kind of thing seems more appropriate for when I’m no longer human. I’m more interested in becoming as fully integrated a human being as I can while I am actually embodied here in the human experience, rather than transcending (rejecting) whole aspects of being a human that are natural and exist for very good and natural reasons.

That be enough of a challenge for this wee human to be getting on with :) x

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