What I Love Most About New York

Photo Credit: Nirzar Pangarkar

Being born and raised in Brooklyn, I could pen a sprawling 10,000-word love letter to the city I’ve called home for the vast majority of my life. But seeing as the sweet spot on Medium is far less than 10,000 words, I’ll just focus on the one thing I love most.

And what I love most about New York is that it’s so big I can forget I exist for a little while. I can forget about all the petty annoyances and selfish hang-ups I possess that are inconsequential in the grand scheme of the world. I can forget about all the things that keep me looking at a single tree instead of seeing the forest.

The city is so vast and so diverse that it puts things in perspective in a way that’s difficult to access during those times when I’m immersed in my own experience and unable to notice anything else.

It’s ironic that most of the city is situated on an island because what New York instills in me is the fact that no man or woman is an island.

And being aware of this helps me realize that we’re all connected and I am a part of something much bigger than just myself. When I view my experience in this manner, I’m constantly reminded in subtle ways that each of us plays an impossibly small but impossibly important role in this sprawling concrete ecosystem.

And, I think, having this understanding in a broader sense about our lives is such a necessary part of our existence.

Of course, this perspective is not something exclusive to New York City. Far from it, in fact.

Anyone who walks in nature or takes a moment to admire the night sky or who mindfully coexists with other human beings can come to the same conclusion about our place in the world and our relationship with what’s around us. But perhaps, what can be said about the way in which New York inspires these crucially important feelings is how easily it does so for those of us who need that perspective most of all.

And that reality, above all else, is what I love about New York.

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