Do I Need A Chimney Liner?

What is Chimney Liner?

A flue lining in a masonry chimney can defined as “A ceramic, clay or metal channel fitted inside the chimney, intended to contain the combustion products directs them to the outer environment, and saves the chimney walls from heat and corrosion”

Do I need a chimney liner?

Typically, it is recommended that you should line your chimney. Building regulations do not claim that you set a chimney liner. You do not need to fit a chimney liner in following cases:

  • If a chimney can be confirmed sound (using a set smoke test procedure)
  • If it is of a diameter appropriate for the stove
  • If the stove-fitter can link to the chimney in a way that carries the regulations well
  • And the end result is that the stove draws within the parameters laid down by the stove manufacturer

Chimney liners offer the three main functions as follows:

  1. Saving the house from heat transfer to combustibles Within the NBS tests, unlined chimneys permitted heat to maneuver through the chimney thus apace that the adjacent woodwork caught hearth in mere three and half hours.
  2. Chimneys have been built of brick, clay and mortar for over a thousand years. If you get them cleaned and inspected annually by a professional, you’re good to go. In my world, logic and common sense are senior to sales pitches. If someone told you that you need a liner, the thing to do is get a second opinion. Our standard annual service includes a full cleaning and inspection and we’ll give you the straight scoop.
  3. Protecting the masonry from the corrosive by-products of combustion. In the tests it was determined that if the flue gases were allowed to penetrate to the brick and mortar, the result would be a reduction in the usable life of the chimney. The flue gases are acidic in nature and literally eat away at the mortar joints from inside the chimney. As the mortar joints erode, heat transfers more rapidly to the nearby combustibles and dangerous gases such as carbon monoxide can leak into the living areas of the home.

In summary:

Chimneys have been built of brick, clay and mortar for over a thousand years. If you get them cleaned and examined annually by a professional, you’re well to go. In my opinion, taking a decision right away is not good. If someone tells you that you need a liner, the thing to do is get a second opinion. You can always hire a professional chimney lining company for more details.

It is not possible that hot gases to make it all the way up the chimney, or there gasses were so laden with moisture from the chimney vented, now more efficient furnace that the gasses would condense on the sides of the chimney, then freeze, resulting the chimney to crack.

Basically it is now recommended that if you vent gasses out of a chimney, you should install a chimney liner if the gasses have a chance to condense on the chimney. They are not too much expensive and it saves the chimney.

Source: http://www.go4sop.com