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Millennials represent 50% of the workforce. Overlay that with the predicted skills shortage in the fintech space, and it’s clear that as an industry, we need to appeal to this generation.

In an ever more competitive global landscape, how attractive our sector is for millennial innovators and entrepreneurs will be central to the future success of fintech services.

So how do we attract them?

Gallup recently produced a report on how millennials like to work and live.

One area that came out of this study was really interesting and vital for employers to understand. Millennials want coaches, not bosses. They care about having managers who will develop them, and who value them as people and employees. And millennials want to understand and build on their strengths rather than address their weaknesses. …


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Well, what a start we’ve had to 2020! If I’d been told a year ago that the globe would effectively shut up shop in March of this year, I’d never have believed it.

Covid-19 is the first global pandemic in our lifetimes, and there’s no doubt it’s led to a massive crisis with high losses in terms of health, economies, and social costs. It has put our human-made systems, that we were so proud of, under a microscope and shown them to be sorely lacking.

From shortages of essential equipment leaving health workers feeling exposed, through to the collapse of financial markets, the halting of production lines, and stalling of travel, we have never witnessed anything like it before. …


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When you think about the elements of a dream job, what comes to mind? For me, it’s not having to scrape ice off the car before a winter’s morning commute. No sitting in 8 am motorway traffic jams. And having flexibility; whether that’s to pop out to your child’s nativity play or to do your supermarket shop when it’s quiet. Sounds idyllic.

Does this job exist?

Yes, it does, if you’re working from home. Roll out of bed and be at your desk half an hour later — clothes optional.

Remote working, which is more often than not working from home, is growing, and the tech sector is up there at number two in the industries adopting it. The BBC reported a 74% jump in those working from their homes over a ten-year period. And those figures are heading up. What’s more, with the current Coronavirus crisis, it might be a situation more are forced to try whether they like it or not. …


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(Yes, we know…we’re a few days late!)

2019! It sounds like ancient history already doesn’t it? But it was certainly an amazing, maybe even a record year for mergers and acquisitions and investments. You may know that January is named after the ancient Roman god Janus, the god of the future. Depicted with two faces, he looks both backwards to the past and forwards to the coming year.

So with Janus in mind, I thought it was worth taking a look at what drove the tremendous growth we saw, whether it will continue, the positives and negatives and the impact on the broader global fintech market. …


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I’m talking about salary structures. Those systems beloved of HR departments that are used to decide how to compensate employees. They usually take into account aspects such as employment length and comparative pay scales.

Often, you’ll find grade-based structures with multiple levels and broad ranges for each level. You slot each position into a certain level based on the scope of the role, the authority, and the skills needed.

Most companies use salary structures to some degree. But do they really have any relevance in today’s modern and complex workplace?

What’s their purpose?

They’ve been around for years and were designed to provide a framework to manage base pay. For many, these structures form the basis of the financial agreement with an employee. They also provide a level of clarity around different salary levels. …


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Why does it matter?

Unemployment levels are at a historic low. The skills shortage is growing. As a result, it’s a candidate-driven market. Good people have lots of high-potential businesses battling over them. In such a competitive environment, having a well-thought-out recruitment plan that attracts these candidates to you is vital for success.

Word of mouth is still the most powerful form of marketing and the best way to positively impact your employer brand.

The interview process is one fantastic opportunity a company can use to take advantage of this, simply by providing a positive & engaging experience to candidates they meet or interact with. …


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Part of running a successful business is building your brand reputation. Your goal should be to reach the point where someone sees your logo and immediately knows what you stand for as a company and an employer — your values, your aims, the way you deal with your customers. This is not a quick process. Every communication, every interaction. Each tweet, each phone call. All these little things add up to create your reputation, bit by bit.

Reputation is a key tool in your recruitment armoury

Your employer reputation can make the difference between attracting the top talent you need to take your company forward, or always struggling to fill those vital vacancies. It can give you a massive competitive advantage.


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Picture the scene. You’ve met with a great candidate, and you’re reviewing what the interview team thought. The person had relevant experience, was confident and came across well. They could demonstrate how they’d contributed to their current company. They were enthusiastic about how they could input to your role. But from nowhere comes the comment “I’m just not sure they’re right for us.”

What’s really being asked here?

You may not have thought about it in these terms, but what’s being asked is “are they a ‘culture fit’?”

According to Harvard Business Review, who know about these things, culture fit is ‘the likelihood that someone will reflect and be able to adapt to the core beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours that make up your organisation.” …


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Regular readers will know that I work for myself at Callum James. And I’ve been doing so for the last ten years. But is working for yourself all it’s cracked up to be? Does it deliver that elusive positive work-life balance we all crave?

Well, like any situation, there are pros and cons. Only the individual concerned can decide whether the downsides are worth the benefits.

One thing’s for sure, it’s not all long holidays and a relaxing, stress-free existence — far from it! In fact, last year, I started to feel a bit disillusioned and unfulfilled. …


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The perfect work-life balance. That elusive idyll that commerce has strived for since, oh, the industrial revolution. During the 1930s there were predictions that we’d all be working a 15-hour week within a century. As for the phrase ‘work-life balance’, we should recognise the Women’s Liberation Movement of the 1980s for coining it, emerging during their persistence in fighting for maternity leave and flexible work schedules for women.

Things have moved on quite a bit since then

Today the issue of work-life balance includes strategies aimed at efficient time management, higher productivity and increased wellbeing for all genders. Concerns about mental wellbeing, paired with the power of today’s technology, have driven a major shift in thinking in flexible work practices. …

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CallumJamesCnsltng

#SearchAndSelection for the Financial Technology Industry #FinTech #FinancialTechnology

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