A series of iPad 4 screenshots in support of Caitlin’s position on Russiagate.

Oh no. A legal expert is invoked to prove Caitlin Johnstone badly and dangerously wrong about Russiagate.

This legal expert is very expert. He knows what everything that has happened means in terms of what is going to happen next. That is, he is both an expert and a prophet. He is on his way to vindication and a massive parade when he reports that ABC had just reported that Flynn at his Russiagatiest worst was acting on Trump's orders, which is meant to contradict a CNN report from a few minutes earlier, which claimed he was acting on his own. Can’t have it both ways, so Experty McExpert-Face picks the one that fits his lengthy, breathless, multipart narrative.

Oops. That ABC thing turned out to be false, and a head has rolled. Not ISIS-whom-Russia-battles-in-Syria-rolled. A head rolled figuratively, of course. This must be a bummer for the legal expert, who will probably delete his whole house of cards now that it is a pile of cards not unlike that pile of cars under the Oakland overpass that pancaked them in the 1994 earthquake. I was in the Bay Area for that earthquake, by the way, so I am an expert on it.

The legal expert was still tying together the various strands of his story at Tweet number 65, but clearly the wind was out of his sails as he’s tying Flynn to Kushner on matters relevant to Israel and the UN, which is different from tying Russia to President Trump on matters relevant to Americans.

That’s cool though. President Trump is still bad, so it’s never the wrong time for Guardian Australia to rehash unproven allegations about him, and they were ready with fresh horses[hit] to pick up where the legal expert’s series of unproven allegations fizzled off.

It’s not just a cottage industry for intensely partisan blue-check Twitterers, this Russigate conspiracy theory, it’s a multinational defamation campaign perpetrated by cable news, academia, and the small portion of the resistance that isn’t employed by one or both of those two state-like actors.

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