This is hateful and mean, but I doubt you care how a man feels about it.
This is hateful and mean, but I doubt you care how a man feels about it.
Traubster
1511

You found the poem hateful and mean. How so? There is just one statement in the poem containing the word “men.” It is a statement about the men who raised her. We are left to wonder which men can be construed as having raised her. Is it the boys or men who raped her, or is it every man who ever walked the earth? Probably not the latter. In any case, there is no opinion accompanying the statement about men, nor any imperative like “burn in hell.”

You doubt she cares how a man feels about the poem, failing to supply any reason that she should. The evidence argues for the opposite. Surely the poem, like most poems, was written to evoke emotion, not necessarily pleasant, in its audience. If she didn’t want men to read it she would have called it “Why I’m Changing Manicurists.” Does she care whether men who read the poem feel great or lousy as a consequence? I read the thing: I hope not.

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