Image for post
Image for post

Dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia are potentially devastating learning disabilities that affect three of the core areas of schooling: reading, writing, and math. Chaya Greenspan, who founded Work n’ Play Inc. in 2012, says the visual and auditory systems work separately but also jointly to deliver the most pertinent information they can gather to the central nervous system. However, in some people, these systems can malfunction or not work at all when they aren’t properly integrated, which can lead to inhibited reflex function and visual or auditory processing issues like dyslexia.

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia, which affects anywhere from 5–10% of the population, makes reading extremely difficult. Dyslexics have trouble processing the graphic symbols that constitute our alphabet and form our words, routinely seeing the letters all jumbled up, blurry, backwards, or three-dimensionally. …


Image for post
Image for post

Playing with other children is an important developmental process that kids go through strengthening their social skills, physical coordination, cognitive development, and emotional intelligence. This can present a huge problem for children with special needs who may be unable to participate in certain activities with their peers due to their physical disabilities, neurological disorders, or other impairments.

In some cases, they are shunned by other kids or even adults, which is a bitter pill to swallow for a kid that just wants to play and feel normal for a time. In other cases, they exclude themselves from taking part due to their own insecurity or limitations. It doesn’t help matters that many of the activities and games that most of us take for granted are not well suited to those with special needs. …


Image for post
Image for post

We use some combination of our five outward senses (hearing, smell, sight, taste, and touch) to process external stimuli so we can respond to them as needed. If we smell smoke, we look for a fire, while if we hear a car coming, we look for it to keep out of its way. In addition to those outward senses, we also have two inner senses (vestibular and proprioception) that help flesh out our model of your body in relation to the objects in your environment, controlling our spatial orientation, balance, and overall inner awareness.

Essentially senses give us information that often trigger default reactions in our body dictating how we feel and act about that information. Those default reactions originated in a survival instinct that sometimes can be lifesaving but often not conducive with solutions or relationships. When these senses are integrated harmoniously with other parts of our brain, we are more likely to be available for higher order thinking, such as problem solving and dialoguing, effectively responding appropriately to the situation. …

About

Chaya Greenspan

Chaya Greenspan of Teaneck, New Jersey is a holistic pediatric occupational therapist. She has over 15 years of experience in the field.