Change Research Only Pollster to Call Florida Primary for Gillum

Contact: Caleb Cade | Caleb@stgresults.com | (903) 539–6732

(Palo Alto, California) — A Change Research poll released last week showed Andrew Gillum winning the Florida Democratic primary with 33% of the vote — making it the only pollster to predict Gillum’s stunning victory last night.

The poll of 1,178 likely Democratic primary voters (including 241 early voters) conducted from August 18–19 showed that Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum led the race for the Democratic nomination for Governor of Florida, with 33%.

“The accuracy of our data and Andrew Gillum’s incredible victory tonight show us one thing: if you keep relying on 2016 polling techniques to predict races in 2018, you’ll be wrong” said Pat Reilly, co-founder and Chief Growth Officer of Change Research.

Mike Greenfield, co-founder and CEO of Change Research added, “We at Change Research are rethinking polling. Our Bias Correct Engine means that candidates like Andrew Gillum — who are outspent and underfunded — can get access to accurate polls without breaking the bank. We are democratizing polling by getting accurate results for a fraction of the cost and in less than half the time.

Change Research was founded with one goal in mind: bringing polling to the people.

  • Change Research offers polling that cuts the average time for results from 7 to 14 days down to just 1 to 5 days (depending on region and sample size).
  • While traditional polls usually cost between $30,000 and $50,000, Change Research offers polls at an average of only $5,100.
  • Change Research’s Bias Correct technology targets voters in a district, state, or region by using online ads with targeting that dynamically adjusts to ensure a representative sample as responses pour in — allowing the data team to quickly and automatically weight and analyze the poll to provide top notch insights.

Polling was conducted online, August 18–19. Change Research polled 1,178 likely Democratic primary voters (including 241 early voters) conducted across Florida, using its Bias Correct Engine to attain a sample reflective of the state. Post-stratification was done on age, gender, ethnicity, region, and 2016 Democratic primary vote.