I can see a case where the intellectually honest people who are not black might say that they can…
Francis Luong (Franco)
2

We’ve seen a lot of instances where “intellectually honest people” who are not black take the stance that because they “can’t fully appreciate” what black people go through they’ll simply sit on the sidelines and pass on even trying. “Can’t fully” is being used as a license to not even try.

That you would even float that turd in the Medium punchbowl is offensive on every imaginable level. That’s the trouble with the world now.

I have no patience for anyone who uses “can’t” as a hall pass. These same people can’t fully appreciate that —

  • Racism is alive and well
  • Black Americans are being killed with impunity on a daily basis
  • Black Americans are forced to deal with it every day of their lives
  • Black Americans do not eat their young, but love them with the same intensity and tenderness as people of other races
  • Black Americans are humans

(I could go on, but I have better things to do with my time than explain the obvious to a man with above average intelligence who wants to parse words.)

We do not live in a world of absolutes. It takse neither full appreciation nor full understanding of the misogyny and sexism women face by the hour; the judgment the LGBTQ community encounters, the ostracism the disabled deal with, the racism people of color battle daily, the cloak of invisibility cast foisted upon the elderly by society, or the ridicule those with psychological or physical challenges deal with. What it takes is compassion.

Be real.

I can’t believe you‘ve had the nerve to actually say to a woman anything close to “no amount of imagining can stand in for direct experience for being a woman blah, blah, blah.”

No shit.

I’m willing to bet — with 95% certainty — that no woman (or anyone else for that matter) expects you or anyone else’s imagination to stand in for their direct experience. So stop playing that card. But it would be nice if you and those “intellectually honest people” would step off the well lacquered soapbox of condescension and allow what you can understand about another’s situation to move you.

If the best you can do is hope for a different place to stand at look at things, go stand on the sidelines and get out of the way of those of us who are attempting to make the world a better place for everyone.

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