I have seen all sorts of behavior since BlackLivesMatter became a hash-tag.
Francis Luong (Franco)
11

You’ve seen all sorts of behavior???

I’ve seen all sorts of behavior, too; but I’m not taking the bait to recount all sorts of behavior.

And the “all sorts of behavior” you’re implying is not perpetrated or endorsed “by” BlackLivesMatter. Nice try, though.

In some instances, your words “Black lives matter, you idiots, and we shouldn’t have to say it” are most apropos.

How much patience would you say is an adequate amount for Black American’s to extend to others in order that they have opportunity to fully appreciate and understand that the lives of Black Americans are just as important as everyone else’s? How much coddling need take place? A little anger once in a while can be a good thing, lest some mistake patience as a weakness or even worse, passive consent. Christ even got angry.

The movement BlackLivesMatter, the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, and the statement “Black lives matter” carry no tone. They are in and of themselves neutral. Something else is at the root of your pissed off-ed-ness about BlackLivesMatter. Maybe it’s the fact that black people are being killed with impunity. Or maybe it’s that black people are crying out across the country that our lives are equally as important as white lives. Perhaps the different analogies (the rainforest, houses on fire, snow, etc.) all makes sense and you’re frustrated that it’s beginning to sink it. Or worst of all, maybe you’re beginning to realize that you don’t believe that the lives of black people are just as important as everyone else’s. Idunno. That’s on you to figure out.

See, here’s the thing. You get it. I know you get it. You know you get it. And you know I know you get it … but for some reason you choose to not let go of the old thinking.

I’ve encountered people who didn’t “get it,” but we talked, had a decent and civil conversation and they got it. (Mind you, I’m not saying that I’m a great explainer. What I’m about to say is that these people opened their mind to another point of view.) The guy I spoke with who inspired my “Going Through“ article “got it” in less than ten minutes. And the number of words he and I exchanged on the subject of the mattering of black lives—his questions and my responses—total less than you and I have written on the same topic. So, of the two of us, who should be pissed off: the guy who’s patiently explained why his life is as valuable as anyone else’s or the guy who still can’t concede that the other guys life is as valuable as anyone else’s?

Your thinking is much like a person who’s only lived in a tropical climate who’s never seen snow and refuses to believe that such a thing can exist because they can’t fully understand what snow, snowdrifts, and blizzards are like. Refusal to open one’s mind to the existence of snow does not negate it’s existence or it’s damaging effects, even when told by someone who’s experienced it firsthand.

The fact that the lives of black people are just as important as all other lives is a law. It’s a universal law that can not be broken. To say, think, or believe anything diametrically opposed to that law does not break that law, but breaks the person who holds that belief.

This is not about how people act, it’s about how they think. I’ll discuss just about anything with anyone, but there comes a point when I have said all that I’m going to say. And that’s usually when people are content to pontificate as opposed to taking action.

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