Code.gov Federal Source Code Summit Logo 2020

By the Code.gov Team

It’s been over a month since our first annual Federal Source Code Summit: Building Coding Communities, and we are still basking in the afterglow of an amazing summit. With nearly 200 participants and 13 guest speakers and panelists, we can honestly say that our first summit was a tremendous success. We shared important information and ideas — learned where we are, our path forward, and had a lot of fun along the way.

Though originally slated for the spring of 2020 as an in-person event we ended up having to take a hard pivot to a…


Federal Source Code Study Logo (Code.gov)

As summarized in Part 1 of this series, the study explored four organizational factors believed to be hindering or aiding agency publication of OSS. The organizational factors were cultural beliefs, public engagement, structural dimensions, and organizational location. Each has been explored through a separate blog post ending with this one pertaining to organizational location.

Organizational Location

Organizational location should not be confused with physical location, rather it instead refers to where a unit resides hierarchically (i.e., its location on an organizational chart) and proximity to authority. …


Happy confident successful multiethnic workers standing. Credit:Fizkes (Getty)

This is a guest post by Ian Lee, a computer engineer and student mentor who is committed to improving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s engagement with the open source software community.

Software underpins much of the scientific discovery happening at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and open source has been part of our computing culture for a long time. Like many organizations during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Lab quickly adapted to telework and welcomed hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students into virtual internships.

Our open source community was already primed for student participation. Open source software (OSS) by definition is freely…


By Joe Castle Ph.D. and The Code.gov Team

As summarized in Part 1 of this series, the study explored four organizational factors believed to be hindering or aiding agency publication of OSS. The organizational factors were cultural beliefs, public engagement, structural dimensions, and organizational location and each will be explored in an upcoming series post. We continue here with structural dimensions.

Structural Dimensions

Social structure in organizations provides arrangements for gathering information to achieve a collective outcome, the very reason for organizational life. Social structures in organizations pertain to relationships among people, positions, and organizational units. Researchers who study organizations…


Accessibility Button on Computer Keyboard (Credit:GOCMEN, Getty Images)

By Anna Zhang, Code.gov Coding it Forward Fellow

Last month we celebrated the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The landmark legislation sought to guarantee equal access and opportunity for people with disabilities. For many, accessibility means the creation of designated parking spaces or installation of wheelchair-friendly ramps and lifts. …


Rayvn Manuel, Sr. Application Developer/Architect and DevOps Engineer for the National Museum of African American History and Culture (Photo Courtesy of Rayvn Manuel)

By The Code.gov Team

We’re back with another installment of Better Know an Engineer. We are pleased to feature a friend of Code.gov and all-around amazing person Rayvn Manuel of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. While COVID-19 won’t allow us to visit the museum right now, we encourage you to check it out when they reopen their doors — it’s truly an awe-inspiring experience.

Name: Rayvn Manuel

Hometown: Bronx, NY

Education: BS in Psychology, BS in Information Technology — Web Design and Development, Masters in Software Engineering — focus on Web Applications

Title/Position: Sr. Application Developer…


Federal Source Code Study Logo

By Joe Castle, Ph.D. and the Code.gov team

Greetings coders! We’re back with our fifth installment of our Federal Source Code Series. Here at the halfway point we hope you are gaining some good information about Code.gov and our mission and vision for open source in government. Additionally, we hope that this series serves as a primer for our Federal Source Code Summit on October 8, 2020.

As summarized in Part 1 of this series, the study explored four organizational factors believed to be hindering or aiding agency publication of OSS. The organizational factors were cultural beliefs, public engagement, structural…


Technology Network Data Connection. Credit:Kanawatvector (Getty Images)

By: Evan “Taylor” Yates and Justin Gosses Org: NASA OCIO Transformation & Data Division (TDD) Open Innovation Program Date: 5/12/2020

Why Quantify Reuse of Government Code?

Congress requires Government agencies to publish a percentage of their code as open source, and for good reason. Open-source software promotes high-quality government code, maximizes code utility to the public, and saves taxpayer dollars by encouraging inter-agency code reuse. While few would question the benefits of open-source software, it is difficult to quantify those benefits in a meaningful way.

There are three main inhibitors when attempting to quantify the benefits of open-source software: (1)…


Dollar sign on cyber background (Getty Images: Arkadiusz Wargula)

By The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Code.gov

Open source software (OSS) is a fundamental aspect of how the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has served the public in its short history. In April of 2012, nine months after opening our doors, we released our source code policy, based on the work of the Department of Defense, along with our first two open source projects. Just six days later, we accepted our first pull request. Though a minor change, this was the first documented contribution to a federal government open source codebase by a member of the public.


Federal Source Code Study Logo (Code.gov)

By Joe Castle, Ph.D. and Code.gov

We’re back with our fourth installment of the Federal Source Code Series. As summarized in Part 1 of this series, the study explored four organizational factors believed to be hindering or aiding agency publication of OSS. The organizational factors were cultural beliefs, public engagement, structural dimensions, and organizational location and each will be explored in an upcoming series post. We begin here with cultural beliefs.

There is a lot of academic and industry research on culture and its various components. …

Code.gov

Sharing America’s Code

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