Your post makes some excellent points and I have read research that says showing people facts that…
Stephen Feingold
11

“So is there any way to try and change someone’s opinion?” I think there are — just ways different than battering people with more facts.

The biggest is probably active listening. I think a lot of Trump supporters are an odd mix of disgusted by him and enthralled. They don’t feel heard by anyone else (including the establishment Republicans, who really have screwed them over); one of their big “fears” is that people like you and me don’t give a shit about them and won’t listen to them … so the most direct counter is to make them feel heard by listening. A lot of the Fox-news extremism is [sometimes] best undone by listening to someone attentively and respectfully until they slowly string their story around to deserve the respect offered. (This works re crankyism on the left too.) You don’t have to say much, mostly ask real questions, going slow.

And for aggressive-politics, you have to know which fears are operative before you can try to peel voters from a candidate. You can’t try to convince Trump supporters — who fear that they and their community are being screwed — that they should fear Trump being corrupt for doing things like bribing a prosecutor. If we’re conscious of their fears, that means our politics has to prove that we are on their side (“qualified” does not do this!) and that Trump isn’t. Clinton should be sharing stories of contractors that were initially excited to work for Trump (have to include that part — she keeps under-emphasizing it) and then were screwed.

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