Pro Skiers and Snowboarders Take Colorado Climate Deniers to Task

By Jessica Goad

Climate change does not bode well for winters. Research shows that it will cause higher temperatures, decreased snowpack, and shorter cold seasons. The bottom line is this: climate change is happening, and it’s going to have serious effects on our snow and seasons. This science is settled; in fact, according to NASA, 97 percent of scientists agree that man-made climate change is occurring.

But you wouldn’t know that from recent discussion in Colorado’s state legislature. In fact, a number of elected officials in the Centennial State have adamantly denied that climate change is real. For example:

And:

Colorado Independent on Senator John Cooke, March 29, 2016

Luckily for the climate, these comments weren’t allowed to slide. Pro skiers and snowboarders decided that enough was enough, and jumped into the fray. Here’s Anna Segal, a professional freeskier, Olympian, and World Cup champion taking down Rep. Lundberg:

Kaya Turski, a freestyle skier and Winter X Games champion, added on:

via Facebook

And Jeremy Jones, a pro snowboarder and owner of Jones Boards called for the “depoliticization” of climate change:

And Jake Black, a snowboarder and photographer, stated on Instagram that he was “offended” by the climate denial:

Here’s the kicker: it’s not just that climate change will impact our abilities to get outside and have fun on the slopes. In fact, winter sports are a major economic driver. One study from University of New Hampshire economists determined that the winter tourism industry supports 212,000 jobs and creates $12 billion in economic revenue. If the snow goes, the money goes too.

Coloradans — as well as tourists who travel from far and wide to play in our snow — value snow, and want to see action on climate change. But this passion must translate to political will by getting the right leaders into office.

As the advocacy group Protect Our Winters summed it up: “Remember this come election time.”

By Zach Dischner — Dropping In, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40573316