End African Elephant Poaching by Banning the Ivory Trade

The Honorable Tshekedi Khama, Minister of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism for Botswana

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A herd of elephants in Botswana
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Honorable Tshekedi Khama, Minister of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism for Botswana
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President Seretse Ian Khama, Tourism Minister Tshekedi Khama and other officials at the unveiling of an elephant sculpture made entirely from ivory tusks at Gaborone’s international airport. PHOTO: Monirul Bhuiyan / Press Photo

For Africans, elephants are worth much more alive than dead.

For Africans, elephants are worth much more alive than dead. Poachers and ivory traffickers are stealing our heritage for a fraction of its value — a living elephant generates $1.6 million in tourism revenue over its lifetime, which is 76 times the value of its tusks on the black market.[2] And while the benefits of poached ivory flow primarily to foreign brokers and dealers, the benefits of live elephants accrue primarily to local communities in host nations, such as Botswana.

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Elephant conservation efforts from films & technology to wildlife policy. Learn more aboutthe Great Elephant Census and African Elephant Atlas. #ElephantsCount.

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