The Closure Of The Infamous Fabric London

This past year has been a dreary one for the most hard core party revellers in both the UK and Europe. This is mainly due to the closure of the most infamous party location in the UK, Fabric London. The closure was finalised in September 2016 after the party powerhouse had their licence revoked due to the death of two visitors who were autopsied and discovered to have overdosed on Class A drugs.

The club which ranks amongst the worlds best clubs with Berghain in Berlin and Air in Amsterdam was mourned in the clubber world as hundreds of thousands of people as well as internationally renown Dj’s such as Calvin Harris and Kygo and many more big names petitioned to have the club reopened. After a few months of closure the club was reopened again in January after heavy pressure from the people of London. Mayor Khan confirmed all of the proceedings.

However there has been implications put in place in order to prevent the drug use in the club. The age restrictions of the club were also raised by a year, silly I know, the club requires you to be nineteen now as the two deaths on the premises were eighteen, it is foolish to assume that the only people taking drugs are eighteen year olds. In addition the amount of security has increased. The club now uses sniffer dogs, random blood checks and the machines that check weight imbalances in shoes in order to make sure people aren’t smuggling drugs into clubs using their shoes as well as lifetime bans for anyone who enquires about drugs. This different approach to security and scaremongering has not gone down well with the party go-ers who feel as if they are having their privacy impeded.

One reason why people go to clubs such as Fabric, Ministry of Sound and Egg LDN is to do narcotics and dance the night away. This is always going to be an issue and a lot of people feel as if the law should assist people who take drugs as it will always happen even if there is a heavy crackdown on them. However some people feel as if this is a good move as it may encourage people who do not like drugs to come more often.

The sheer impact that the closure of such a well established nightclub, which lasted more than twenty years was devastating to the party scene. The petitions to reopen reached well over 100,000. The club itself has been described as ‘legendary’ and ‘iconic’ in the past. Although I have never been myself, my friends have told me that it is not as great as it once was. One day I am sure I will find out what Fabric has to offer, I don’t imagine that day will come soon as most of my friends are under 19 but I am sure it will be in the works.

The Closure Of The Infamous Fabric London

This past year has been a dreary one for the most hard core party revellers in both the UK and Europe. This is mainly due to the closure of the most infamous party location in the UK, Fabric London. The closure was finalised in September 2016 after the party powerhouse had their licence revoked due to the death of two visitors who were autopsied and discovered to have overdosed on Class A drugs.

The club which ranks amongst the worlds best clubs with Berghain in Berlin and Air in Amsterdam was mourned in the clubber world as hundreds of thousands of people as well as internationally renown Dj’s such as Calvin Harris and Kygo and many more big names petitioned to have the club reopened. After a few months of closure the club was reopened again in January after heavy pressure from the people of London. Mayor Khan confirmed all of the proceedings.

However there has been implications put in place in order to prevent the drug use in the club. The age restrictions of the club were also raised by a year, silly I know, the club requires you to be nineteen now as the two deaths on the premises were eighteen, it is foolish to assume that the only people taking drugs are eighteen year olds. In addition the amount of security has increased. The club now uses sniffer dogs, random blood checks and the machines that check weight imbalances in shoes in order to make sure people aren’t smuggling drugs into clubs using their shoes as well as lifetime bans for anyone who enquires about drugs. This different approach to security and scaremongering has not gone down well with the party go-ers who feel as if they are having their privacy impeded.

One reason why people go to clubs such as Fabric, Ministry of Sound and Egg LDN is to do narcotics and dance the night away. This is always going to be an issue and a lot of people feel as if the law should assist people who take drugs as it will always happen even if there is a heavy crackdown on them. However some people feel as if this is a good move as it may encourage people who do not like drugs to come more often.

The sheer impact that the closure of such a well established nightclub, which lasted more than twenty years was devastating to the party scene. The petitions to reopen reached well over 100,000. The club itself has been described as ‘legendary’ and ‘iconic’ in the past. Although I have never been myself, my friends have told me that it is not as great as it once was. One day I am sure I will find out what Fabric has to offer, I don’t imagine that day will come soon as most of my friends are under 19 but I am sure it will be in the works.

I asked friends of mine who frequently go out in London to have a say.

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