Graphic Designer graduate. Full Stack Web Developer. Retired Tech & Gaming Editor.

And why you should just buy a console and an iPad

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Christian Wiediger on Unsplash

One of the key parts of any PC “Gamer” is the graphics card. A decade ago there was a good price point between USD $200 and $400, at most. Now, you’re just picking what console to buy instead.

You can call me a mad, crazy, or literally ignorant, but there are many facts that suggest the “PC Gaming” as we knew it is dead, being relegated to an afterthought or a clearly highly enthusiast market. No more sweet-pricing deals, no more games pushing the boundaries, PCs components for games have moved to luxuries.

Graphic cards for games became a niche

The “cryptocurrencies armageddon” made graphic cards higher on demand. Even companies founded themselves on the profit made by buying a GPU and keep it mining cryptocurrencies 24/7. …


The ball just went out of their court

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Ales Nesetril on Unsplash

Just as Apple killed the aging PowerPC architecture from mainstream by migrating to Intel x86 powered chips, the Cupertino based company is doing it again in favour of ARM.

The once considered leader of x86, Intel, slept on the job for a decade. You wanted performance, you would go over x86. No more.

The 40-old architecture didn’t show its age until Apple invested highly on ARM by buying PA Semi in 2008, the same folks that gave some light to PowerPC after it went “open” bacause IBM was already out of ideas. From there, the company made iPhone chips powerhouses by themselves, with each iteration dropping support for older designs and features — something that x86 never could possible do without the risk of breaking the core of the world itself, as almost all software has been made for x86. They know mobile was the future, bet on it, and paid off. …


I couldn’t resist the temptation to pick Go and see how it’s different from PHP and Rust

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Lukáš Vaňátko on Unsplash

After this comment in my last article, I had a mild realization when checking my options: I wasn’t considering the Go language in all of this.

Both languages, Rust and Go, appeared almost at the same time, but their focus is kind of… different. While Rust offers “C++ done right”, exposes manual control almost everywhere and close-to-the-metal performance, Go says that for some tasks you don’t need to go THAT deep as long you’re fine with sharing a little of latency for the garbage collector it includes.

Loris Cro simplifies the performance comparison in a nice catchy phrase:

Go is fast, but Rust is…


A strictly typed language like Rust as a lot of differences.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Safar Safarov on Unsplash

This is a series of blog post where I document my transition from PHP, an interpreted language, to Rust, a system programming language, while exploring some paradigm differences between both as a long-standing PHP developer.

Articles in this series:

When entering the Rust world you will instantly know that is not some quick and basic language. It really is different from dynamically typed languages which are very easy to pick up and program for. Rust wants everything declared, everything “typed”, everything in its place. …


From being on taxis to travel around the city, to your own car for going anywhere.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Eric Nopanen on Unsplash

This is a series of blog post where I document my transition from PHP, an interpreted language, to Rust, a system programming language, while exploring some paradigm differences between both as a long-standing PHP developer.

PHP have served me right, until now. I have felt that PHP has become something too restrictive for my own projects. I’ll get this straight right away: PHP is not a bad language, is a very useful one specially when paired with frameworks like Symfony and Laravel, but it still lingers behind in features when compared to other languages, like Javascript (Node.JS), Python, Go, or even Rust. …


The solution is rather simple: just do it.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Ben Curry on Unsplash

If you recall what I wrote recently, you will know I made a prototype of a microservice system privately. The whole system itself contained a two PHP applications made using the Lumen micro framework: one for handling Contracts, and another for Clients, each with its own database inside.

While the prototype worked, there was one problem: it wasn’t elastic. In other words, we can’t automatically spawn more microservices to serve more requests in a reliable way.

Let’s say we make a second and third instance of the Contracts microservice because there is too much people signing up. Since each microservice contains its own database, creating a new instance would also make a new empty database, and the proxy who manages the connection to the Contracts microservices will route the new requests to these new instances that contains nothing, since these databases also spawn anew. …


Not all apples drop from the same tree, some are faster to hit the ground

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jan Antonin Kolar on Unsplash

I was tasked not long ago to make a tiny private prototype. The old application was a monolithic w32 API software which wasn’t friendly with the Internet, and my prototype was a microservice-oriented web app. Given the current pandemic, most of work is being routed to web interfaces, and some applications are being hammered down to the point of data corruption, timeouts, or worse, virtual lines. …


Unless a huge turnaround comes as a surprise

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Joshua Hoehne on Unsplash

Imagine a world where you turn on your PlayStation 5 and open the xCloud app to play Halo Infinite. Then receiving a call in your Samsung Galaxy and handing-off the call to your iPad with the Samsung Flow app.

This currently is not possible. You would never see an Xbox app in PlayStation, nor a Samsung app in the App Store, but Epic Games may open up the way for this open ecosystem if everything goes according to plan.

Epic Games played their cards well yesterday. Being big and owners of a big product — Fortnite in case it’s your first time on the Internet — they had the necessary leverage to actually fight one of the “given” things in today’s world: App Stores. …


Why you shouldn’t pay another battle pass for cosmetics?

Image for post
Image for post
Valve ©

Cosmetics around Dota 2 has always been an economy on its own. Before the “Immortal” rarity of items, artists would create and sell their creations with a good return of investment, and players fueled this approach enough to Valve to notice. Whales came in and there was no problem ignoring them, the game was still growing.

Fast forward to 2020, all indicators point to a game slowly declining, and most of the rewards on the game are being heavily paywalled in an attempt to milk those who have invested more than enough as the last hurrah.

This is not a critique for the Battle Pass, but the other way around. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Something that confirms the current state of affairs between Dota 2 and its lifecycle. …


The less you hit your keyboard, the faster you finish. Who knew.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Icons8 Team on Unsplash

There seems not many people like Laravel, and some frameworks in general along the vast space of languages. I don’t like it too much, I started there assuming there is a good tool for quick web applications, but not microservices (what I’m doing now) and other close-to-metal software. I know that Laravel pushes convenience and expressiveness above all else. Being PHP, in the microservices realm sometimes it becomes a PITA to deploy.

The thing is, Laravel, among other frameworks, has been known to have some backslash from savvy developers who identify one big violation to the SOLID principles:

  • Single Responsibility: One thing should do only one thing. …

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store