The Most Instagrammable Locations in America and How They Did It

Are you keeping Instagram and social shareability in mind for your business?

Here’s why you should.


Iconic corners in NYC: total Instagrammer bait.

It’s become both a cliché and socially acceptable to shamelessly pose in front of and/or snap away at brilliantly art directed locations. In fact, the most savvy businesses have done it on purpose to give their spaces that extra decor oomph in the hopes that it will set them apart in today’s ultra competitive market.

Smart move. Deliberately keeping social shareability in mind for your company’s brick-and-mortar location is one brilliant way to get the world to notice it. Give the Instagrammers what they need to compose an exceptional piece of visual content and reap the benefits of being exposed to their massive engaged audiences. Don’t believe me? I personally know people who frequent certain locales just to “get the shot.” Now that’s social power.

It’s always nice to hang out in places with an inspiring decor, but you know it’s on a whole other level when you feel like it’s a thing. There are a ton of popular locations that became admired by people who had never even stepped foot in them, thanks to Insta influencers having induced FOMO with their photos. Nowadays, business owners need to get clever and conceive attractive interiors to facilitate social recognition.

Are you skeptical? Good. Because we’re here to dive deeper into the sensation. While some hot spots are known simply for their beautiful decor and photographed abundantly to furnish the Instagram galleries of the most influential (think LA’s Commissary at The Line hotel or any Butcher’s Daughter location), certain places have distinguished themselves thanks to a novelty feature. The kind that’s like crack to content creators. The kind that gets your establishment noticed beyond your local patronage. The kind that brings it instant recognition. Simply put, the kind that makes it famous through virality.

So what do these places look like, one might question? We identified four locations that became popular through Instagram thanks to a specific aesthetic attribute, and monitored their geotags. Below you’ll see the exposure potential a business can have if it puts that extra little thought into social shareability. Whether or not these places did it on purpose is not confirmed, but they certainly validate the theory.

Places, Places

Mr. Holmes Bakehouse

This bakery is famous for its cruffins (YUM) but what really made Mr. Holmes Bakehouse rise to national hype is their (in)famous and oh so cheeky “I Got Baked in San Francisco” neon sign. It makes one wonder if the lines around the block to get in are for the actual pastries or for photos of their wall.

The Mr. Holmes Bakehouse geotag is so popular that in just 4 weeks, over 1000 Instagram users tagged the location and brought the business over 3 million impressions.
You can see just how popular their sign is when sifting through all of the posts that tagged the San Fran Mr. Holmes Location. People be going in just for it. And maybe a cruffin (or two).

Cisco Home

Ever heard of Cisco Home in LA? Probably not. But have you seen this “Made in LA” mural before? Chances are, a thousand times over, amiright?! This furniture shop may not have a big Instagram audience, but boy do they rack in the geotags. Even if Cisco Home’s facade far outshines its recognition, we’ll bet they get a ton of foot traffic into their store just from people making their exterior a bona fide destination. That sounds like a retail win to us.

In the past 4 weeks, the Cisco Home geotag was used 63 times, bringing the store nearly 100K impressions. Bear in mind that these are only the users who used the geotag — this wall appears ad hoc in Insta feeds without the tag, which is still extremely positive for the store.

Paul Smith (on Melrose)

The Paul Smith store in LA’s shopping mecca is superfamous and there is no doubt that you’ve been exposed to it at least once, whether or not you’ve actually physically been there. It’s THAT famous pink wall. Its outer shell was painted this color far before Instagram was even invented… little did they know the two would be a match made in content creation heaven.

There’s no denying that the color pink is having a moment, making it perfect Insta fodder and undoubtedly bringing collateral shoppers to Paul Smith on Melrose. Rumor has it the wall actually has its own security detail. Get it, Paul Smith.

In just 4 weeks, the “Paul Smith Pink Wall” location (it has its own geotag) was tagged over 1,500 times by users and received over 6 million impressions. It should probably get a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at this point.
Just scrolling through all the tagged post thumbnails, check out this sea of pink!

Alfred Coffee

There’s no doubt that you’ve seen the following saying go by in your Instagram feed as either a quote or a photographed sign: “But First, Coffee.” And you likely weren’t aware that it originated from Alfred Coffee (they have multiple locations), unless the post was geotagged. This mini coffee franchise isn’t one of the most Instagrammed in the country for nothing — not only does this caffeine motto express a pretty universal consensus, but Alfred’s has made sure to feature it prominently in a cool, original way in all of its stores.

For example, it’s laid out very matter-of-factly in the Melrose location, while its Silverlake shop boasts a rad neon sign atop a funky, hipster-approved floral wallpaper. There’s also a bonus in Silverlake: a heart mural on one of the walls * almost* rivals the OG coffee maxim. The folks at Alfred nailed it.

Their Melrose store location was tagged over 800 times in the past 4 weeks, bringing it over 10 million impressions.
The sign that started it all.
Their Silverlake location wasn’t tagged as much, but it’s still one of the most exciting interiors to share pics of.
Case in point: most of the photos shared at Alfred Coffee in Silverlake include the neon sign or the heart mural.

Is it a complete coincidence that these 4 places happen to be in California, 3 of them in Los Angeles? Technically it is, but maybe it’s also a testimony to the fact that the Golden State has fully embraced the social junction at which we find ourselves today.

When you see results like these, it shouldn’t take much convincing to employ a similar strategy for your business. Take for example newcomer on the NYC restaurant scene Pietro Nolita. Before they were even open for customers, they had hordes of Instagrammers posing in front of their pink facade. Once inside the restaurant, everything seems to have been thought through with virality and photogenic purposes in mind, from their all pink everything interior to their Pink as Fuck tees.

There’s simply no denying the influence that Instagram can have over the success of a brand and a business. Aesthetics are more important than ever — almost as much as the quality of whatever it is you’re selling — and if you manifest the power of social sharing, you’ll be off to the races. Because if it’s not big on Instagram, does it even matter? Ruminate on that.


If you’re looking for Instagram help, you’ve come to the right place. Reach out today!

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