How I Actually Quit My Job to Chase Freedom in Only 6 Months

This week’s post is by guest blogger, Eric Windmill. You can find more of Eric’s writings at The Big Escape where you too can learn to chase freedom.

chase freedom
[Marylka Yoe Uusisaari | Flickr | Modified]

There are three type of people out there:

  1. Those who love their jobs
  2. Those who hate their jobs
  3. Those who endure their jobs

Enduring a job is dangerous. Hating your job is sure fire way to seek change. If you love your job, you can stop reading this right now.

If you’re indifferent about your job, you’re well on your way to living a mediocre version of your life.

I used to fit in category three.

The Most Terrifying Thing You’ll Ever Do

In early 2016, I learned about the world of freedom business.

A Freedom Business — A business which exists online so that you can live free.

I became obsessed with this idea.

This is when everything changed. When I found something I couldn’t not do. This was what, luckily, made me start hating my job.

And, just 6 short months later, I strutted out of my job on my last day like I had just made a great accomplishment.

I was still “pre-revenue,” but, dammit, I was going to make my business online happen. It was going to support me.

I was setting out on my own. I was forging my own path.

I was on top of the world. That was a Thursday.

On Monday, I cried like a baby.

Quitting your job is terrifying. The most common thoughts I’ve had since then are “Why did you think you could make this work?” “Why did you give up a happy, normal life, for a lonely, vagabond life?”

“Are you insane?”

To which I promptly answer, “Yes”.

The thing that holds people back from quitting their job and giving entrepreneurship a real shot are these thoughts: fear, doubt, and uncertainty.

These thoughts can be crippling. The days that followed my independence day, I hardly had the ability to work. I was paralyzed.

Talking Vs. Doing (I Talk A Lot)

In the past, I talked a lot about quitting my job. Before I had officially quit my job, I wrote articles about knowing when to quit your job. (How embarrassing.)

I was obsessed with the idea: quit your job, travel the world, AND make money! How dreamy!

The realistic version of that looks a little bit different.

I’m doing it. I’m working my ass off. I’m on a beach. I got everything I wanted.

But, I’m still terrified, and I still miss my old life. No matter what the books and blogs say, security is a fantastic feeling. But you’ll never know that until you stop feeling secure.

Take Action, Eventually

You should definitely quit your job, but you should make sure you have a rock-solid plan first. Some suggestions:

  • A reliable online income or a reasonable savings account that you’re willing to part with.
  • A support system: a spouse or friend that will keep you calm when you want to explode. This was a dire mistake of mine.
  • A good hard look at your worst case scenario. Write down, with excruciating detail, your (realistic) worst case scenario. Hint: It usually ends up with getting a serving job and living in a smaller home. Which I’m assuming you could cope with.
  • A mantra to repeat when you feel like you bit off more than you can chew. (Mine is “I’m not going to die from this.”)
  • A plan. A real plan. How are you going to make money? How long can you last on your savings? Do you have a budget? Can you reach all your execution goals a few months before your money runs out?
  • Ask yourself an important question: “What am I willing to sacrifice?”
  • Be broke for awhile. Give up social outings. Learn to say “no.” The more you’re willing to sacrifice, the sooner you can make the leap.

Take massive action, give up everything that you can, and put all your effort into creating something out of nothing. That is the most rewarding thing you can do.

You can do a remarkable amount of living and working with a small savings account, a laptop, and a free year.

Buzzword: Freedom (It’s Different For Everybody)

Freedom is a buzzword. It’s that simple. It makes people feel a lot, but what does it mean?

It means something different to everyone. As an American, I think about the people from other countries that move to the US to work hard. And that’s freedom to them.

To some, it means traveling full time while working from a laptop. For some, it means being able to work from home so you never miss a moment with your family or children.

The common thread is living life on your own terms. That’s freedom.

To me, freedom is forging my own path. I don’t care if I travel full time or if I live in a tent. Money only matters insofar as I need it to survive. Creating something out of nothing feels really, really good. It’s difficult and it’s skill mastery and it’s learning and it’s everything I love.

It’s hard. It’s scary. And it’s the most worthwhile thing I’ve ever done.

Your Take Away

Freedom is living your life, day by day. It’s not knowing what’s going to happen 6 months down the line. It’s being terrified and tough at the same time.

It’s being completely free to pivot and change paths at any moment. It’s being paralyzed by fear of the idea that you could fall flat on your face.

It’s taking all those feelings in stride and proving that you can forge your own path.

And, freedom is yours (if you want it). It’s completely insane. It’s completely worth it.


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