Falling water house: Much needed inspiration for co-existence with nature

Nature is one element ignored by many people building their dream homes. Often, the surroundings are as important as the interior or color scheme of the house for maximizing the overall aesthetic quality. One of the best examples where a structure exists in perfect harmony with nature is the falling water house designed by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright for the Kaufmann family. Wright believed in designing structures that would be in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. Here are some pointers we can take from his work and apply in our homes.

Include natural elements in the building

Natural elements like a waterfall, as in the falling water house, or tree inside the building attempt to mimic Mother Nature within a house. They look stunning and give a distinctive feeling of togetherness with nature.

Image source: fallingwater

Choose building materials wisely

In the falling water house, stone is extensively used along with concrete. One smart observation is that all the horizontal components are made of concrete and vertical structures are made of stone. This, again, is a nice way to represent the blending of man and nature.

Image source: fallingwater

Work the interiors accordingly

In this room, notice the stone flooring near the fire place; such elements give a sense of the wilderness outdoors to people indoors.

Image source: fallingwater

Create a sense of openness towards the surroundings while simultaneously providing a sense of security inside

In the below image, simple windows make up the boundary between the deep wilderness and the comfortable living room. Such is the level of blending that can be achieved by organic architecture.

Image source: fallingwater

There are several other buildings, such as the Fransworth House, that demonstrate the value of organic architecture.

Image source: farnsworth house

Such architecture has the power to influence the mindset of people experiencing it. Making people feel like they are a part of nature is especially important in this age of climate change.

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