Power is concentrating in the hands of the few while being distributed amongst the many. This is part six of our Future Dualities series. If you’re new here, see parts one, two, three, four, and five before reading on.

By Eden Dotan and Lasse Underbjerg

Thinking ahead is messy. In futurism, it’s a widely accepted fact that we cannot predict one true future. There is not one direction forward, but many different –sometimes contradictory– directions happening at once.

Paradoxically, we humans still love a simple story; Good and bad. Us and them. But more than ever, we need to shift away from simplified, binary thinking. If we want to design futures that are truly sustainable for both planet, people and profit, we need to stop oversimplifying our choices. Explore the continuum, present and beyond. …


Our brains are on autopilot, while our souls seek surprise. This is part five of our Future Dualities series. If you’re new here, see parts one, two, three, and four before reading on.

By Eden Dotan and Lasse Underbjerg

Thinking ahead is messy. In futurism, it’s a widely accepted fact that we cannot predict one true future. There is not one direction forward, but many different –sometimes contradictory– directions happening at once.

Paradoxically, we humans still love a simple story; Good and bad. Us and them. But more than ever, we need to shift away from simplified, binary thinking. If we want to design futures that are truly sustainable for both planet, people and profit, we need to stop oversimplifying our choices. Explore the continuum, present and beyond. …


Customer centricity works against sustainability. This is part four of our Future Dualities series. If you’re new here, see parts one, two and three before reading on.

Thinking ahead is messy. In futurism, it’s a widely accepted fact that we cannot predict one true future. There is not one direction forward, but many different –sometimes contradictory– directions happening at once.

Paradoxically, we humans still love a simple story; Good and bad. Us and them. But more than ever, we need to shift away from simplified, binary thinking. If we want to design futures that are truly sustainable for both planet, people and profit, we need to stop oversimplifying our choices. Explore the continuum, present and beyond. But it’s not an easy feat.

To start, we interviewed thinkers…


We are speeding up while slowing down. This is part three of our Future Dualities series. If you’re new here, see the introduction, Future Dualities: From a binary worldview to embracing hybrid futures, and part two, Future Dualities: Community & Independence, before reading on.

By Lasse Underbjerg and Eden Dotan

Thinking ahead is messy. In futurism, it’s a widely accepted fact that we cannot predict one true future. There is not one direction forward, but many different — sometimes contradictory — directions happening at once.

Paradoxically, we humans still love a simple story; Good and bad. Us and them. But more than ever, we need to shift away from simplified, binary thinking. If we want to design futures that are truly sustainable for planet, people and profit, we need to stop oversimplifying our choices. Explore the continuum, present and beyond. …


We find strength in connection and vulnerability in dependence. This is part two of our Future Dualities series. If you’re new here, see the introduction before reading on.

By Lasse Underbjerg and Eden Dotan

Thinking ahead is messy. In futurism, it’s a widely accepted fact that we cannot predict one true future. There is not one direction forward, but many different –sometimes contradictory– directions happening at once.

Paradoxically, we humans still love a simple story; Good and bad. Us and them. But more than ever, we need to shift away from simplified, binary thinking. If we want to design futures that are truly sustainable for planet, people, and profit, we need to stop oversimplifying our choices. Explore the continuum, present and beyond. But it’s not an easy feat.


On the face of it, the use of data, and the meaning it can bring to businesses, is a complex topic to dig into. Can data be a force for good? Richard George from financial, technology, and data experts, Refinitiv, is on hand in EP07 of our YELLO podcast to share his take on the use of data and digital services and their symbiotic relationship.

Whether it’s a customized Spotify playlist that hits just the right chord or the annoying online ads that follow us for weeks, we’re familiar with both the benefits and drawbacks of a data-driven world from the consumer perspective.

In this episode, we explore how individuals and companies can tap into financial and business data to have a positive effect on consumers, businesses, and the planet.

We hope you’ll give the full podcast a listen, but for those strapped for time, we’ve collected highlights below from Richard George’s thoughtful dialogue with our host Guro Røberg, Strategic Design Director from our Oslo…


Original photo by Edwin Andrade on Unsplash

Our modern-day civilisation is built on a trust model that has enabled us to scale from small communities to our current societies by putting our trust into larger institutions. For some time now, this paradigm has become unstable, giving way to the increasing erosion of trust as we know it. What does this mean for businesses and societal institutions? How can trust become something we design for?

By Guillermo Granda and Sophie Parker

In our work as service designers, we bridge private and public institutions, the people they serve, and their mutual goals. While trust plays an important role in this process, it can feel elusive and intangible. We set out to bring this topic down to earth and create actionable tools that we can use strategically as researchers, designers, and technologists.

But of course, before bringing things down to earth, we had to take a bird’s eye view!

What does ‘trust’ mean?

Trust is subtle, dynamic, and deep-rooted in its make-up. Although cultural constructs and biases make trust nuanced on…


Thinking ahead is messy. In futurism, it’s a widely accepted fact that we cannot predict one true future. Instead, we can consider many possible futures. Some more probable than others. Some more preferable. But the further we think the greater the uncertainty and complexity. There is not one direction forward, but many different — sometimes contradictory — directions happening at once.

By Lasse Underbjerg and Eden Dotan

Paradoxically, we humans still love a simple, compelling story: Good and bad. Us and them. But more than ever, we need to shift away from simplified, binary thinking. The world is not black and white. It’s a greyscale gradient. Or even technicolor.

If we want to design futures that are truly sustainable for planet, people, and profit, we need to stop oversimplifying our choices and consider the immense complexity of our world. Explore the tensions along the continuum, embrace our diversity and acknowledge the implications of our actions. Present and beyond. …


Using people’s personal data for providing better public services is a hotly debated topic. One that polarises many. Not least because, at a bare minimum, there are issues of ethics and security that come into play. But what if your data could be used for good? What if, as an example, citizen’s public and private information formed the foundation for a preventative healthcare revolution? Wouldn’t that be a way to rethink the current norm around patient experience? This is a vision that Professor Carsten Obel hopes will soon become a reality…

Although this year has been challenging in many ways, it has presented an opportunity for organizations in the private and public sectors to rethink health provision. Professor Carsten Obel, Professor of Public Health at Denmark’s Århus University, spearheads research into how data can fuel our future health system.

Carsten and his team investigate the applications of patient data through Health 360, a project tracking the development of the COVID-19 infection and its impact on peoples’ everyday lives. Through an app for smartphones and wearables, they collect and analyze information about disease progression from those who test positive. …


Diversity and gender equality in the workplace have made great strides in recent years, but the fact is, change isn’t happening fast enough. There’s still a lot of work to be done in addressing a lack of diversity, inclusivity, and equity in businesses around the world.

What qualities make a good leader? How can we recognize our own biases, and what are the barriers to overcoming them? The CEO of the Nobel Peace Center, Kjersti Fløgstad, joins Designit’s own Kjersti — our European Managing Director, Kjersti Lund, in a conversation about gender equality, sustainability, and leading purpose-driven organizations in the latest episode of YELLO .

Inspiring and educating at the Nobel Peace Center

Fløgstad’s career as former director at Norway’s largest bank and Secretary General of UNICEF Norway has always been guided by her focus on CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) and passion for sustainability. …

Designit

Designit is a global strategic design firm, part of the leading technology company, Wipro.

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