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Diversity and gender equality in the workplace have made great strides in recent years, but the fact is, change isn’t happening fast enough. There’s still a lot of work to be done in addressing a lack of diversity, inclusivity, and equity in businesses around the world.

What qualities make a good leader? How can we recognize our own biases, and what are the barriers to overcoming them? The CEO of the Nobel Peace Center, Kjersti Fløgstad, joins Designit’s own Kjersti — our European Managing Director, Kjersti Lund, in a conversation about gender equality, sustainability, and leading purpose-driven organizations in the latest episode of YELLO .

Inspiring and educating at the Nobel Peace Center

Fløgstad’s career as former director at Norway’s largest bank and Secretary General of UNICEF Norway has always been guided by her focus on CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) and passion for sustainability. …


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Illustration by Kinshuk Bose

The global health crisis has made many of us reevaluate our definition of “bare necessities”. We have had to rethink the line between wants and needs across many industries, including beauty and personal care.

By Priyanka Gangwal and Shipra Bhargava

It’s vital for the beauty industry to envision how nuances and expectations will evolve in the near future. At Designit’s studio in Bengaluru, we conducted research across different states in India just before the lockdown, and one of the key findings suggested that the term “beauty” is often used interchangeably with words like “wellness” and “confidence” by consumers. It indicates the extend to which beauty products and services make users ‘feel good’ when using them.

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Diary study responses

Based on our research insights, we’re suggesting five findings that can be used to design new experiences:

1. Increasing transparency

“My brand believes in the utmost transparency and celebrating the simplest of ingredients that many Indians might have grown up using.” — Owner of an eco-beauty brand.


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From a recent project at Designit’s studio in Stockholm, we learned how designers can create conditions that encourage more sustainable eating habits at work, and how we can all embrace a culture of care and responsibility. It’s not only in the food we eat, but in how we live our lives. This work is part of our Futures theme, Playful unlearning, where we use play to prepare for a future that requires us to think and problem-solve in new ways.

By Alexandra Mateus Abalada

We’ve investigated our work environment and foresee shifts towards ethical food habits and consumption. When seeing the reality of our situation from a planetary perspective, we must recognize our interdependence with life on Earth as part of one complex, living system. In this article, we’ll consider the habits and behaviors we need to unlearn for ethical food consumption, so both us and the planet can thrive.

Research has demonstrated that the striking acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions, sea-level rise, the global mass extinction of species, and the transformation of land by deforestation has led us to an era where the planet is profoundly changed by human civilization (the Anthropocene). In The New Wild, George Monbiot refers to “novel ecosystems” as the reorganization of plants and animals, and how their adaptation is intrinsically linked with human activity in response to climatic and environmental change. …


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Illustration by Raphael Sousa

Often numbers and design are seen as oil and water: they don’t mix. Design is human-centric and traditionally relies on rich qualitative research to drive new ideas. Numbers supposedly threaten to hamper creativity by placing limits on the imagination of the designer. We’ve found that isn’t really the case, since quantitative techniques generate a whole new class of insights that standard design research methods may not uncover.

By Nikolas Black, Diego Jimenez, Miguel Bello, and Raphael Sousa, our designers in Medellín

This article is an introduction to a three-part series. In part one, we’ll share how designers and data scientists can have a mutually beneficial relationship. Part two and part three will dive into specific methods and how designers can use data to tackle twenty-first century challenges.

Customer First

In our pursuit of user-friendly, user-centric, human-centered experiences, we can lose sight of something important: the client. Developing new, interesting products that solve the user needs is ultimately useless if it’s not commercially viable. Numerical data can help us generalize qualitative findings to larger populations. …


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Illustration by Raphael Sousa

Number5 and Design is our three-part series on the role of data within strategic design research. In our second installment, we will outline scenarios that call for a mixed methods approach and which frameworks to use. Before diving in, be sure to check out our introduction to integrating quantitative techniques with strategic design!

By Nikolas Black, Diego Jimenez, Miguel Bello, and Raphael Sousa, our designers in Medellín

Mixed methods research combines both qualitative and quantitative approaches to increase the depth and accuracy of design user research.These methods are rising in popularity in many fields, such as psychology, marketing, and public policy, and they have untapped potential for design. In this article, we’ll outline when using mixed methods is appropriate, the different frameworks to structure research, and the importance of using these techniques in strategic design.

When should I use mixed methods?

The first question to ask is: why do you want to use mixed methods? All types of research have their strengths and weaknesses and mixed methods are no different. We need a reason to justify the additional complexity of a new type of data. …


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Illustration by Raphael Sousa

Welcome back for the third and final part of Number5 and Design! In this series, we’re making the case for a hybrid research approach in strategic design: mixed methods. Mixed methods combines the complementary strengths of traditional design methodology and quantitative research to provide a well-rounded picture of your user base. For our final installment, we’re sharing a case study featuring the techniques we’ve previously covered. If you’re new here, we recommend riffling through part one and part two before jumping in.

By Nikolas Black and Raphael Sousa, our designers in Medellín

In our client work, we’ve witnessed the power of mixed methods design. With one client, we recognized that a range of approaches would be necessary to meet their needs. We identified three categories: fully understanding user behavior, answering business questions in their language, and iterating our designs quickly and consistently.

Here’s how we used quantitative techniques to bring value and affect real change for our client.

Understanding user behavior

Using either qualitative or quantitative methods wasn’t going to give us a complete understanding of user behavior. Qualitative analysis provides rich insights into why users take actions, while quantitative techniques support those findings and answer other key questions, particularly when evaluating the performance of our iterations. …


Introducing new smart, connected products and services entails more complexity than our current consumer electronics. These interactive devices will bring their own unique challenges that will require new approaches and more contextual knowledge. How can strategic design help guide these decisions and explore new business opportunities?

Using autonomous, last-mile delivery service as a pedagogical example, this article will provide an example of what these practices can look like and why their use in early stage development could better support multidisciplinary teams by guiding their decision-making about new products and services.

By Paul Lequay, Lorenzo Davoli, Hanna Markgren, and Rachel Pardo

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You’re walking down the street of Bagarmossen, a small suburban neighborhood in Stockholm. A shiny little robot on wheels approaches you. It’s kind of wonky, it tilts to one side a bit, and it seems to huff and puff to get over obstacles. You hope it will safely make it to where it’s going. The robot rounds another pedestrian and stops at your local grocery store. A store clerk comes out and puts a grocery bag in its box. …


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Illustration by Ruthie Zaslavsky

How has the coronavirus heightened ageism, and how has it reestablished the walls that had begun to crumble between generations?

By Eden Dotan

In the distant pre-corona era, Maye Musk was appointed the face of Covergirl, Allure banned the term ‘anti-aging’, and at the ripe age of 56, Jeff Bezos ruled the world. Old was bold!

But the coronavirus reintroduced us to a different reality. Nations around the world have shown difficulty in prioritizing the health of the elderly over the health of the economy, and ‘Boomer Remover’ has become everything from a trending hashtag to a Spotify playlist.

These uncertain times have brought to the surface what was long hiding underneath it. In the same way the pandemic has accelerated trends like digital transformation or remote learning, it has brought to life a once subtler form of prejudice.


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ReThinking can help us escape uncertainty. Ironically, uncertainty makes ReThinking hard.

By Noam Bernstein

As the world began grappling with the dire effects of the COVID-19 pandemic earlier this year, we created the ReAct ReSpond ReThink framework to help decision-makers navigate the distinct phases of the crisis by applying an appropriate mindset. You can learn more and download the framework for free here.

Through webinars and workshops we have hosted worldwide, Designit has identified, tracked, and made sense of the many similarities in how businesses around the world have been experiencing the crisis.

Borrowing from Tomas Pueyo’s “Hammer and Dance” model, in the “Hammer” phase of the COVID-19 crisis, the ReAct ReSpond ReThink framework mirrors the actions companies need to take, in the following…


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Leaders can drive sustainability by focusing on the long-term impact of their actions, according to Johann Olav Koss. ​​And Johann would know — he founded and built the sustainable global non-profit organization Right To Play over the past 20 years.

The quality of life for future generations and our planet depends on societies taking real action towards securing sustainable futures. While this reality is broadly recognized around the world, our modern economy is embedded with mechanisms that incentivize individuals and organizations to myopically focus on the next quarter’s results, rather than looking 20 years ahead. According to Johann, this is a big mistake, ​​since he has quantifiable evidence proving that sustainable organizations are the future.

Sustainability principles for long-term growth

The sustainability agenda has entered the perspectives, preferences, and behaviors of consumers and employees across the globe, and companies need to adjust accordingly. “Regulations, environment, and people are driving behavior and supply and demand structures are driven by people’s interests,” Johann explains. …

About

Designit

Designit is a global strategic design firm, part of the leading technology company, Wipro.

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