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Asexual Authors Speak Out About Representation (And Ostracization) In Fiction

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Adapted from Pixabay

Too often, sexual and romantic relationships are presented as the most meaningful relationship you can have.

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Asexuality is so ignored by the media it seems they don’t even know it exists.

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It’s easy for people to read your bios, but your novels are much more than a series of titles. How would you describe your overall body of work?

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Sophia Beaumont, Lynn O’Connacht, and Claudie Arseneault

What drives you to tell these particular stories?

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Too often, sexual and romantic relationships take the center stage and are presented as the most meaningful relationship you can have.

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Do you think being self published gives you more freedom to be true to your characters’ asexual (and other queer) identities than you would at a big publisher?

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I made a heroine who is afraid and sad and still saves the day.

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Self publishing is still the most welcoming option for queer stories, but we’re starting to see a lot more queer identities in mainstream fiction, as well. Have you noticed this shift affecting asexual representation in mainstream publishing?

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It’s still seen as ‘necessary’ or ‘normal’ that if you’re an adult, you’re supposed to be in a sexual relationship.

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And that idea is rooted in the ageist belief that teenagers can’t truly know what they want, which is incredibly harmful. Lynn, any thoughts on recent shifts in mainstream asexual representation?

I’d love to hear a bit more about your feelings on that, Lynn. How do you think that misrepresentation damages the indie community, and how can we challenge those perceptions?

I’ve definitely seen those lists proclaiming “these are the few books with asexual rep,” but when I put out a call for #ownvoices authors to interview I spoke with dozens of indie authors publishing books with asexual characters. And it’s clear that the asexual community (especially in the Twitter space) is starved for this representation, but there’s a scarcity mindset that keeps them from finding the right authors.

Let’s see if we can break that scarcity mindset. Who are some indie authors you’d like to give a shout out to, and how can readers support them?

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Do you think readers can play a role in pushing larger book blogs and/or magazines to review more indie authors?

All right. Final question! We’ve already spoken about how people can find and support indie authors in general, but how can they find and support YOU?

Want even more asexual fiction? Check out these resources:

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Written by

Freelance blogger and digital marketing professional preparing for my first YA fantasy book release in 2017. I blog @SteamCav

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