The point is that the endless pontificating on “what framework is best” is silly, and should stop. If you aren’t picking a framework because it’s the best tool for your project or team, you’re probably doing it wrong.
For posterity: This article doesn’t present a debate: it is instead a (somewhat lopsided…
Mr. Jackdaw
72

I believe I see a potential bug here:

  1. The point is that the endless pontificating on “what framework is best” is silly, and should stop.
  2. If you aren’t picking a framework because it’s the best tool for your project or team, you’re probably doing it wrong.

To accomplish #2, one have to do some research to figure out what would be the "best tool for your project or team".

If #1 stops, or never happen, one wouldn't be able to have data to do #2, the research needed to answer which is the “best tool for your project or team”.

#2 is logically dependent on #1. So, if there is no #1, there would be no way to have success on #2.

We need to expose and talk about the pros and cons of our options (in our tech case: tools, frameworks, languages, servers, etc.) in order to be able to increase our chances of possibly choosing a "best tool".

Angular is a good example of this. At some time in the past it became to be really famous, and suddenly everyone "bought it" and started using it on a variety of projects. It was perceived then as the “best tool for your project or team”.

Later, it becomes to be known how bad is its performance issues, but then, for most it was already too late. A unexpected budget to a refactory was already needed.

Just after a lot of #1, we were are able to go for #2 and realize which could be the "best tool for your project or team", and that, it may not be that one “the best” which once seemed to be.

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