How to Torture Your Employee By Talking About Cut Backs and Financial Concerns As Frequently As Possible

Dear Employee,

We’re going to have to cut back on expenses as much as possible. Business has been tough this year, as well as last year, so it’s in all of our best interest to manage our expenses as much as possible.


Dear Boss,

Thanks so much for letting me know, as well as informing me about this earlier today, and yesterday, and the day before that. And last Wednesday. And at the company party. And when we all heard you on the phone the other day. And last year, and the year before that. And in my interview for this job. And in the job listing, and the business plan, dating all the way back to your caveman ancestor who wrote on a cave wall that animal meat was getting low. Thank you for making me aware that we need to cut down on expenses as much as possible. It’s very relaxing. By the way, have you ever read Old Yeller?


Why your torture plan will surely backfire

Security is a core human need. Your anxious ramblings about the financial situation of the company triggers anxiety, sending employees into panic mode, their heads screaming, “Do I need to find another job???”


Maybe Try This Instead?

Figure out why you are frequently and publicly relaying the state of financial affairs of your business. Is it because people are acting irresponsibly or is it because you are leaking your anxiety all over the place? If it’s the former, it might be time to set some rules. If it’s the latter, get a business advisor or consultant to help you target what needs to be fixed in the business. Financial matters need to be figured out by you, not by anyone on the planet that will listen.


This post was originally featured on Equilibrialeadership.com.

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Nicole Lipkin, Psy.D., MBA is an organizational psychologist and the CEO of Equilibria Leadership Consulting. She is the author of “What Keeps Leaders Up At Night” and the co-author of “Y in the Workplace: Managing the ‘Me First’ Generation.”