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Inevitable collapse of debt.

all infrastructure in the modern sense we are familiar with is a construct of cheap surplus fossil fuel energy resources.

So arguing about “who pays for what” is irrelevant. It is taxation, and taxation itself rises or falls according to government income availability. When the world had access to cheap surplus energy, taxes flowed into government coffers, and everything could be built that the electorate demanded. This is where Roosevelt’s “new deal” came from: the availability of oil coal and gas so cheap and seemingly limitless it could be regarded as free. So the bridges roads and dams got built and everyone had a job.

But those jobs were ultimately dependent on infinite fuelburning, but the Great Depression was ultimately ended by Adolf Hit ler, who forced an even faster rate of fuelburning by starting WW2

Now there is no cheap surplus energy left, so the idea of “privatised” infrastructure has to be sold to the people so that they will pay for it ‘willingly’ — -not realising they are paying into a limitless scam that is going to cream off the last free cash from the very people who need to use the infrastructure itself.

Public works are an energy sink that can only be sustained by the constantly increasing infusion of energy, otherwise they collapse again. this can only be averted by constant ‘future borrowing’ thus creating debt that cannot possibly be repaid, because (bear in mind that money is a construct of energy) there will be no cheap energy to give support value to money.

Therefore the system must collapse, irrespective of whether money is injected into the system.

Money can be printed, energy cannot. There is no more cheap energy available

This book might explain how we got into this mess:

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